An OpenSCAD Mini-ITX Computer Case

We’re no strangers to 3D printed enclosures here at Hackaday. From the plethora of printed Raspberry Pi cases out there to custom enclosures for electronic projects, small plastic boxes turn out to be an excellent application for desktop 3D printing. But as printers get bigger and filament gets cheaper, those little boxes don’t always need to be so little. We aren’t talking about running off boxes for your sneaker collection either, if you’ve got the time and the print volume, you could whip up an enclosure for your PC.

[Nirav Patel] writes in to share his impressive 3D printed Mini-ITX computer case project, which would be a neat enough trick in its own right, but he took the concept one step farther and made it a parametric design in OpenSCAD. This allows the user to input their particular hardware configuration and receive STL files for a bespoke case. The list of supported hardware isn’t that long yet, but with the OpenSCAD code up on GitHub and released under the BSD license, hopefully the community can improve on that as time goes on.

To keep things simple (and strong), [Nirav] implemented what he refers to as a “bucket” design. The majority of the case is a single print, which does take a long time (just shy of 40 hours on his Prusa i3 MK3), but nearly eliminates any post-printing assembly. Only the optional feet and the lid need to be printed separately. Threaded inserts are used throughout the design for mounting hardware, so you don’t run the risk of blowing out the printed holes during hardware changes or upgrades.

A particularly neat feature, and a testament to the power of OpenSCAD, is the fact that the case’s internal volume is calculated and embossed into the side of the design. Does this have any practical purpose? Not exactly, but [Nirav] thought it would be appealing to the Mini-ITX case modding community which apparently measures their accomplishments in liters of volume.

We’ve seen a 3D printed computer case before, but it used acrylic sheets and couldn’t be made without a large format printer. There’s something to be said for a project that can be completed on the hacker community’s favorite printer.

This entry was posted in 3d Printer hacks, casemod, computer hacks, mini-itx, openscad, parametric, software hacks, volume. Bookmark the permalink.

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