Monthly Archives: February 2019

Teardown Of A Luxury Bluetooth Nightlight

If you had asked us yesterday what peak nightlight technology looked like, we might have said one of those LED panels that you stick in the outlet. At least it beats one of those little wimpy light bulbs behind the seashell, anyway. But after looking at a detailed teardown of …read more

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Posted in IMU, led, led hacks, lighting, Microcontrollers, nightlight, nRF52832, teardown | Leave a comment

Zach Archer: Live Coding 500 Watts For ToorCamp

ToorCamp is a five-day open air tech camping event held every two years somewhere around the northwest corner of Washington state. Think of it as something like Burning Man, except you can survive for three hours without water, there aren’t a whole bunch of scenesters and Instagram celebs flying in …read more

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Posted in 2018 Hackaday Superconferece, cons, graphics, led, led hacks, LED sign, live coding, Software Development, toorcamp | Leave a comment

Computer Algebra for Electronic Design

Don’t get me wrong. Like most people, there’s nothing I enjoy more than solving a long, involved math problem by hand. But, sometimes, a few pages of algebraic scratches on paper is just a means to an end. I find this especially true during electronic design sessions, be it circuit …read more

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Posted in circuit design, computer algebra, computer hacks, how-to, Maxima, symbolic computation, wxMaxima | Leave a comment

Anodize Aluminum Easily

We’ve all seen brightly-colored pieces of aluminum and can identify them as anodized. But what does that mean, exactly? A recent video from [Ariel Yahni] starring [Wawa] — a four-legged assistant — shows how to create pieces like this yourself. You can see [Wawa’s] new dog tag, below.

[Ariel] found …read more

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Posted in aluminum, anodising, anodizing, chemistry hacks, drain cleaner, lye, sulfuric acid | Leave a comment

Threading 3D Printed Parts: How to Use Heat-Set Inserts

We can make our 3D-printed parts even more capable when we start mixing them with some essential “mechanical vitamins.” By combining prints with screws, nuts, fasteners, and pins, we get a rich ecosystem for mechanism-making with capabilities beyond what we could simply print alone.

Today I’d like to share some …read more

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Posted in 3d Printer hacks, 3d printing, Engineering, fabrication, Featured, functional 3d printing, heat set inserts, Skills, threaded insert | Leave a comment

New Part Day: The STM32 That Runs Linux

There are a lot of ARM microcontrollers out there, and the parts from ST are featured prominently is the high-power builds we’re seeing. The STM32F4 and ~F7 are powerhouses with great support, and the STM32F0 and the other younger children of the family make for very good, low-power microcontrollers. Now, …read more

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Posted in Hackaday Columns, linux, Microcontrollers, stm32, STM32FP1 | Leave a comment

Mayak Turns WiFi Traffic Into Sound

Dial-up modems were well known for their screeching soundtrack during the connection process. Modern networking eschews audio based communication methods, so we no longer have to deal with such things. However, all is not lost. [::vtol::]’s Mayak installation brings us a new sound, all its own.

The installation consists of …read more

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Posted in art, art installation, LTE, wifi | Leave a comment

KiCon Gets Our KiCad Conference On

Oh, what’s KiCon you say? KiCon is the first dedicated conference on our favorite libre EDA tool: KiCad, organized by friend of Hackaday Chris Gammell and scheduled for April 26 and 27th in Chicago.

Having stuffed ourselves full of treats through the holidays, followed by sleeping through the calm winter …read more

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Posted in Bring A Hack, conference, cons, eda, KiCAD | Leave a comment

Teardown: AppLights Personalized Projection

Listen, it hurts to hear, but somebody needs to say it. It’s over, OK? You’ve got to admit it and move on. Sure, you could get away with it for a week or two in January, but now it’s just getting weird. No matter how hard you fight it, the …read more

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Posted in bluetooth, christmas lights, Holiday Hacks, home depot, i2c, led, led hacks, logic analyzer, projector, rgb, teardown, TTC2541 | Leave a comment

Ask Hackaday: Can We Get Someone To Buy And Destroy RAM?

We like blinky things. We’re moths drawn to the flame of serially-addressable RGB LEDs. If the LEDs are smaller, we want to know. If you can drive more of them, we want to know. That said, the most interesting news out of CES last January was both right up our …read more

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Posted in corsair, hardware, RGB LED | Leave a comment