Monthly Archives: April 2019

A DIY EMC Probe From Semi-Rigid Coax And An SDR

Do you have an EMC probe in your toolkit? Probably not, unless you’re in the business of electromagnetic compatibility testing or getting a product ready for the regulatory compliance process. Usually such probes are used in anechoic chambers and connected to sophisticated gear like spectrum analyzers – expensive stuff. But …read more

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Posted in electromagnetic compatibility, emc, fft, ocxo, probe, radio hacks, RTL-SDR, sdr, spectrum analyzer, testing, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

Prusa Launches Their Own 3D Model Repository

If you own a 3D printer, you’ve heard of Thingiverse. The MakerBot-operated site has been the de facto model repository for 3D printable models since the dawn of desktop 3D printing, but over the years it’s fallen into a state of disrepair. Dated and plagued with performance issues, many in …read more

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Posted in 3d model, 3d Printer hacks, makerbot, news, open source, prusa, repositories, thingiverse | Leave a comment

Give Your Solar Garden Lights A Color Changing LED Upgrade

White LEDs were the technological breakthrough that changed the world of lighting, now they are everywhere. There’s no better sign of their cost-effective ubiquity than the dollar store solar garden light: a complete unit integrating a white LED with its solar cell and battery storage. Not content with boring white …read more

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Posted in boost converter, color changing, garden, garden light, joule thief, led, led hacks, nocturnal solar light, solar, solar cell, solar hacks | Leave a comment

GPS Self-Adjusting Clock With An E-Ink Display

If you mention a clock that receives its time via radio, most people will think of one taking a long wave signal from a station such as WWVB, MSF, or DCF77. A more recent trend however has been for clocks that set themselves from orbiting navigation satellites, and an example …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, clock hacks, glock, gps, time | Leave a comment

Radio Piracy on the High Seas: Commercial Demand for Taboo Music

The true story of pirate radio is a complicated fight over the airwaves. Maybe you have a picture in your mind of some kid in his mom’s basement playing records, but the pirate stations we are thinking about — Radio Caroline and Radio Northsea International — were major business operations. …read more

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Posted in Featured, history, pirate radio, radio caroline, radio northesea international, shortwave | Leave a comment

Making Microfluidics Simpler With Shrinky Dinks

It’s as if the go-to analogy these days for anything technical is, “It’s like a series of tubes.” Explanations thus based work better for some things than others, and even when the comparison is apt from a physics standpoint it often breaks down in the details. With microfluidics, the analogy …read more

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Posted in control, film, microfluidics, misc hacks, plastic, polystyrene, science, Shrink film, shrinky dinks, Tesla valve | Leave a comment

Mowerbot Keeping The Lawn In Check Since 1998

Mowing the lawn is a chore that serves as an excellent character building excercise for a growing child. However, children are expensive and the maintenance requirements can be prohibitive. Many instead turn to robots to lend a hand, and [Rue Mohr] is no exception.

[Rue]’s creation goes by the name …read more

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Posted in autonomous lawnmower, classic hacks, lawnmower, robot lawnmower | Leave a comment

The Simplest Of Pseudo Random Number Generators

A truly random number is something that is surprisingly difficult to generate. A typical approach is to generate the required element of chance from a natural and unpredictable source, such as radioactive decay or thermal noise. By contrast it is extremely easy to generate numbers that look random but in …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, classic hacks, pseudo-random, random number, sequence generator | Leave a comment

Circuit-Level Game Boy: Upping Emulation Ante By Simulating Every Cycle

Usually when writing emulation software for a system like the Game Boy, one makes sure to take as many shortcuts as possible in order to reduce the resources required for the emulation. This has however the unfortunate side-effect that it reduces the overall accuracy of the emulation and with it …read more

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Posted in emulation, fpga, game boy, hdl, nintendo, Nintendo Game Boy Hacks, simulator | Leave a comment

Component Shelf Life: How To Use All That Old Junk

There are two types of Hackaday readers: those that have a huge stock of parts they’ve collected over the years (in other words, an enormous pile of junk) and those that will have one a couple of decades from now. It’s easy to end up with a lot of stuff, …read more

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Posted in antique parts, components, Hackaday Columns, hardware, parts, pcbs, shelf life, smd components | Leave a comment