Monthly Archives: May 2019

Freeform ESP8266 Network Attached Data Display

Like many of us, [Josef Adamčík] finds himself fascinated with so-called “freeform” electronic designs, where the three dimensional circuit makes up sections of the device’s structure. When well executed, such designs really blur the line between being a practical device and an artistic piece. In fact his latest design, an …read more

Continue reading

Posted in art, brass, Circuit Sculpture, ESP8266, Microcontrollers, mqtt, oled | Leave a comment

Make Your Own Old School LED Displays

We live in an era in which all manner of displays are cheap and readily available. A few dollars spent online can net you a two-line alphanumeric LCD, a graphical OLED screen, or all manner of other options. Years ago however, people made do with little monolithic LED devices. [sjm4306] …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 7 segment, display, led, LED display, led hacks | Leave a comment

A Work Light For Hacker Events

If you’ve ever attended a hacker camp, you’ll know the problem of a field of tents lit only by the glow of laser illumination through the haze and set to the distant thump of electronic dance music. You need to complete that project, but the sun’s gone down and you …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, led, led hacks, light, lighting, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

glScopeClient: A Permissively-Licensed Remote Oscilloscope Utility

One of the most convenient things about modern digital oscilloscopes is that you can access the recorded data on a computer for later analysis, advanced protocol debugging, or simply the convenience of remote capture. The problem is that the software isn’t always ideal. Vendor-supplied utilities are typically closed-source and they …read more

Continue reading

Posted in glscopeclient, oscilloscope, protocol analyzer, tool hacks | Leave a comment

The Motor Synth Is What You Get When You Forget Hammond Organs Exist

There’s nothing new, ever. It’s all been done. But that doesn’t mean you can’t invent something interesting. A case in point is the Motor Synth, a crowdfunding project from Gamechanger Audio. It’s what you get when you combine advanced quadcopter technology with the market for modular and semi-modular synthesizers.

The …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Crowd Funding, crowdfunding, synth, synthesizer, tonewheel | Leave a comment

Sonic Screwdriver Shuts Off Mains

In the world of Doctor Who, the sonic screwdriver is a versatile tool with a wide range of capabilities. [Hartley] wanted some of that action for himself, and built a device of his own.

Unable to recreate the broad swathe of features from the show, he settled on something easier. …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 433MHz, classic hacks, Doctor Who, sonic screwdriver, wireless outlet | Leave a comment

Keeping Birds At Bay With An Automated Spinning Owl

There’s nothing wrong with building something just to build it, but there’s something especially satisfying about being able to solve a real-world problem with a piece of gear you’ve designed and fabricated. When all the traditional methods to keep birds from roosting on his mother’s property failed, [MNMakerMan] decided to …read more

Continue reading

Posted in ATtiny Hacks, attiny85, charge controller, solar hacks, solar power, spinning | Leave a comment

Linear CCDs Make For Better Cameras

Digital cameras have been around for forty years or so, and the first ones were built around CCDs. These were two-dimensional CCDs, and if you’ve ever looked inside a copier, scanner, or one of those weird handheld scanners from the 90s, you’ll find something entirely unlike what you’d see in …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, CCD, linear CCD, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Visualizing How Signals Travel In A PCB

If you play with high speed design for long enough, eventually you’re going to run into clock skew and other weird effects. [Robert Feranec] recently ran into this problem and found an interesting solution to visualizing electric fields in a PCB.

A word of warning before we dig into this, …read more

Continue reading

Posted in electric field, high speed, pcb, Simbeor, SPICE, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Drag And Drop Files On Select Arduino Boards

Historically, getting files on to a microcontroller device was a fraught process. You might have found yourself placing image data manually into arrays in code, or perhaps repeatedly swapping SD cards in and out. For select Arduino boards, that’s no longer a problem – thanks to the new TinyUSB library …read more

Continue reading

Posted in adafruit, arduino, Arduino Hacks, tinyusb, usb | Leave a comment