Monthly Archives: June 2019

Digital Multimeasure Helps You Get The Job Done

In any mechanical field of work, accurate measurement is key to success. [Patrick Panikulam] knows this well, and decided to build a device that would be useful for some of the more tricky measurement tasks he was encountering.

[Patrick]’s digital multi-functional measurement tool packs a bunch of useful hardware into …read more

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Posted in measurement, metrology, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Exploring The Dell N1108T-ON Ethernet Switch

In an era where everything seems to be getting “smarter” every year, it will probably come as no surprise to find that even relatively middling networking hardware is now packing advanced features and considerable computational power. A case in point is the Dell N1108T-ON Ethernet switch. Despite only costing around …read more

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Posted in cross compile, Network Hacks, networking, root, serial port, software hacks, Wireguard | Leave a comment

Game Builder Lets Kids — Even Old Kids — Build Games

One rite of passage back in the good old days of owning a TRS-80, Commodore 64, or similar vintage computer was writing your own game. It probably wouldn’t be very good, but it wouldn’t be much worse than most of the stuff that was out there, either. Today, trying to …read more

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Posted in game builder, game development, Games, Software Development, video game | Leave a comment

Neat Smart(ish) Watch Build Uses BLE

Digital watches are a pretty neat idea, and are a great way to experiment with designing and building low-power circuits. That’s what [Eric Min] did with this neat smart watch build. It’s based around an nRF52832 SoC that does all of the heavy lifting, including connecting to a smartphone to …read more

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Posted in ble, smart watch, wearable, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Modeling The Classic 555 Timer On A Breadboard

Over the years, readers have often commented that microcontrollers (or more specifically, the Arduino) are overkill for many of the projects they get used in. The admonition that the creator “Should have used a 555” has become something of a rallying cry for those who think modern electronic hobbyists are …read more

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Posted in 555 timer, 74ls00, classic hacks, lm358, model, parts, square wave | Leave a comment

Add Scroll Wheels and Buttons to Smartphones with 3D-Printed Widgets Read by Accelerometer

The first LED digital wristwatches hit the market in the 1970s. They required a button push to turn the display on, prompting one comedian to quip that giving one to a one-armed man would be in poor taste. While the UIs of watches and other wearables have improved since then, …read more

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Posted in accelerometer, button, Cellphone Hacks, haptic, IMU, input, intertial measurement, phone, scroll wheel, smartphone, UI | Leave a comment

Mac Plus Becomes A Vector Display

The vintage Macintosh all-in-one computers were a design icon, as well as being highly useful machines in the 80s and 90s. In the decades since, they’ve been used for everything from web servers to aquariums, but that’s not all. [Arcade Jason] decided to grab an old Macintosh Plus and turn …read more

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Posted in Mac Hacks, macintosh, vector, vector display | Leave a comment

Play Dough Simplifies Interferometer Build

An interferometer sounds like something complicated, and in a way, it is. But it is also pretty easy to build one with some common materials. [Let’s Innovate] has instructions for how to make an interferometer using a green laser pointer, some mirrors, and a CD case. one of the most …read more

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Posted in green laser, interferometer, laser hacks, laser pointer, Michelson interferometer | Leave a comment

Building a Mag Lev Optical Table

When you’re talking about optics, things are often happening on a nanometer scale. This means that even the slightest amount of vibration can spoil delicate work. [The Thought Emporium] is working on a long-scale project to produce chocolate holograms, and needed a stable surface to set up some optical components. …read more

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Posted in laser, laser hacks, laser table, optical table | Leave a comment

Simulating the Enigma’s Oddball Cousin

Even if you wouldn’t describe yourself as a history buff, you’re likely familiar with the Enigma machine from World War II. This early electromechanical encryption device was used extensively by Nazi Germany to confound Allied attempts to eavesdrop on their communications, and the incredible effort put in by cryptologists such …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, alan turing, Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, encryption, enigma, The Hackaday Prize, world war II | Leave a comment