Monthly Archives: September 2019

Keeping Kids in School the Smart Way

For institutions with high traffic, such as schools and movie theaters, it can be difficult to keep track of individuals moving in and out, especially without a critical mass of security. For schools especially, keeping track of student attendance and preventing kids from leaving campus in the middle of the …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, africa, fingerprint reader, Raspberry Pi, RFID card, schools, security hacks, The Hackaday Prize, Tunisia | Leave a comment

Off-World Cement Tested for the First Time

If the current Administration of the United States has their way, humans will return to the surface of the Moon far sooner than many had expected. But even if NASA can’t meet the aggressive timeline they’ve been given by the White House, it seems inevitable that there will be fresh …read more

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Posted in aggregate, cement, concrete, crystallization, Current Events, Featured, mars, moon, space, space exploration | Leave a comment

Alternative Photography Hack Chat

Join us on Wednesday, October 2 at noon Pacific for the Alternative Photography Hack Chat with Pierre-Loup Martin!

It seems like the physics of silicon long ago replaced the chemistry of silver as the primary means of creating photographs, to the point where few of us even have film cameras

…read more

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Posted in art, camera, Chemistry, collodion, Hackaday Columns, optics, photography, silver, The Hack Chat, wet plate | Leave a comment

The Legacy Of The Floppy Still Looms Over Windows

We no longer use floppy disks on the vast majority of computers, but a recent Old New Thing blog post from Microsoft sheds light on one of their possible unexpected legacies. It seems Windows disk cache items expire after two seconds, and as the post explains this has its origin …read more

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Posted in computer hacks, dos, floppy disk, microsoft, windows | Leave a comment

What On Earth Is A Pickle Fork And Why Is it Adding to Boeing’s 737 Woes?

It’s fair to say that 2019 has not been a good year for the aircraft manufacturer Boeing, as its new 737 MAX aircraft has been revealed to contain a software fault that could cause the aircraft to enter a dive and crash. Now stories are circulating of another issue with …read more

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Posted in aircraft, boeing, Boeing 737, Current Events, news, pickle fork, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

Probe the Galaxy on a Shoestring with this DIY Hydrogen-Line Telescope

Foil-lined foam insulation board, scraps of lumber, and a paint-thinner can hardly sound like the tools of a radio astronomer. But when coupled with an SDR, a couple of amplifiers, and a fair amount of trial-and-error tweaking, it’s possible to build your own hydrogen-line radio telescope and use it to …read more

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Posted in 1420.4058 MHz, bandpass filter, fft, GnuRadio, horn, hydrogen line, LNA, Radio Astronomy, radio hacks, sdr, spectrometer, waveguide | Leave a comment

The Price of Domestic Just In Time Manufacturing

Hardware is hard, manufacturing only happens in China, accurate pricing is a dark art. Facts which are Known To Be True. And all things which can be hard to conquer as an independent hardware company, especially if you want to subvert the tropes. You may have heard of [Spencer Wright] …read more

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Posted in Asia, bom, Centerline Labs, china, cogs, domestic, fm radio, hardware, manufacturing, mason jar, misc hacks, radio, supply chain, The Public Radio | Leave a comment

This Word Clock Has Dirty Alphanumeric Mouth

Clocks which use words to tell the time in place of numbers are an increasingly popular hacker project, but we have to admit that before seeing this gorgeous clock from [Mitch Feig], we didn’t realize how badly we wanted to see one that could curse like a sailor.

But don’t …read more

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Posted in alphanumeric display, clock hacks, ESP32, led, Microcontrollers, web interface, word clock | Leave a comment

DIY Thermal Imager Uses DIY Gaussian Blur

Under the right circumstances, Gaussian blurring can make an image seem more clearly defined. [DZL] demonstrates exactly this with a lightweight and compact Gaussian interpolation routine to make the low-resolution thermal sensor data display much better on a small OLED.

[DZL] used an MLX90640 sensor to create a DIY thermal …read more

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Posted in digital cameras hacks, diy, gaussia, gaussian, Microcontrollers, MLX90640, oled, Thermal, thermal imager | Leave a comment

Chinese Radio Telescope Hopes to Find Exoplanets FAST

People who enjoy radio are constantly struggling to find a place to erect a bigger and better antenna. Of course it’s a different story and the most hardcore end of the spectrum: radio astronomers. The Chinese are ready to open up a new radio telescope called FAST (Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical …read more

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Posted in china, news, Radio Astronomy, radio hacks | Leave a comment