Monthly Archives: November 2019

Let A CPR Robot Save The Day

Four highschool students in Lyon France are building a CPR robot, with the aim of removing the endurance problem faced by those delivering this form of essential first aid.

By every after action report, CPR is an emotionally and physically exhausting way to save a life. When someone’s heart stops …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, CPR, robot, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Multi Material 3D Printing Makes Soft Robot

When you zoom in on a fractal you find it is made of more fractals. Perhaps that helped inspire the Harvard 3D printers that have various arrays of mixing nozzles. In the video below you can see some of the interesting things you can do with an array of mixing …read more

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Posted in 3d printer, 3d Printer hacks, 3d printing, hotend, mixing hot end, multimaterial | Leave a comment

Circuit Simulation in Python

Using SPICE to simulate an electrical circuit is a common enough practice in engineering that “SPICEing a circuit” is a perfectly valid phrase in the lexicon. SPICE as a software tool has been around since the 70s, and its open source nature means there are more SPICE tools around now …read more

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Posted in analog circuit, circuit, integration, LTSpice, modeling, numpy, programming, python, simulation, software hacks, SPICE | Leave a comment

Simple Acrylic Plates Make Kirlian Photography a Breeze

We know, we know – “Kirlian photography” is a term loaded with pseudoscientific baggage. Paranormal researchers have longed claimed that Kirlian photography can explore the mood or emotional state of a subject through the “aura”, an energy field said to surround and emanate from all living things. It’s straight-up nonsense, …read more

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Posted in acrylic, capacitive coupling, corona, corona discharge, dielectric, high voltage, kirlian, misc hacks, tesla coil | Leave a comment

Robot vs. Superbug

Working in a university or research laboratory on interesting, complicated problems in the sciences has a romanticized, glorified position in our culture. While the end results are certainly worth celebrating, often the process of new scientific discovery is underwhelming, if not outright tedious. That’s especially true in biology and chemistry, …read more

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Posted in 3d printer, 3d Printer hacks, biology, camera, Chemistry, d-bot, lab, microbiology, Octoprint, open source, Pi camera, Raspberry Pi, reprap, research | Leave a comment

Landbeest, A Single Servo Walking Robot

Walking robots have a rich history both on and off the storied pages of Hackaday, but if you will pardon the expression, theirs is not a field that’s standing still. It’s always pleasing to see new approaches to old problems, and the Landbeest built by [Dejan Ristic] is a great …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, Hackaday Prize, robot, robots hacks, strandbeest, The Hackaday Prize, walker | Leave a comment

DSP Spreadsheet: Talking to Yourself Using IQ

We’ve done quite a bit with Google Sheets and signal processing: we’ve generated signals, created filters, and computed quadrature signals. We can pull all that together into an educational model for two SDRs talking to each other, but it’s going to require two parts: modulation and demodulation. Guess what? We …read more

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Posted in digital signal processing, dsp, Hackaday Columns, quadrature mixer, spreadsheet, tool hacks | Leave a comment

A Fantastic Frontier of FPGA Flexibility Found in the 2019 Supercon Badge

We have just concluded a successful Hackaday Superconference where a highlight for many was digging into this year’s hardware badge. Shaped in the general form of a Game Boy handheld gaming console, the heart of the badge is a large FPGA opening up new and exciting potential for badge hacking. …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, badge hacking, conference badges, cons, Current Events, Featured, fpga, fpga board, FPGAs, Hackaday SuperConference, Superconference | Leave a comment

Simplified AI on Microcontrollers

Artificial intelligence is taking the world by storm. Rather than a Terminator-style apocalypse, though, it seems to be more of a useful tool for getting computers to solve problems on their own. This isn’t just for supercomputers, either. You can load AI onto some of the smallest microcontrollers as well. …read more

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Posted in ai, artificial intelligence, Espruino, gesture, microcontroller, Microcontrollers, open source, tensorflow, watch | Leave a comment

That’s It, No More European IPV4 Addresses

When did you first hear concern expressed about the prospect of explosive growth of the internet resulting in exhaustion of the stock of available IP addresses? About twenty years ago perhaps? All computers directly connected to the internet must have an individual unique address, and the IPv4 scheme used since …read more

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Posted in internet, internet hacks, ip address, ipv4, IPv6, Network Hacks, news, ripe | Leave a comment