Monthly Archives: January 2020

A Custom Raspberry Pi 4 Arcade Cabinet

Over the years we’ve covered quite a few Raspberry Pi based arcade cabinets, and admittedly many of them have been fairly similar. After all, there’s only so much variation you can make before it stops looking like a traditional arcade machine. But even still, we never tire of seeing a …read more

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Posted in arcade cabinet, classic hacks, emulation, Games, Raspberry Pi 4, retro gaming, scanline, woodworking | Leave a comment

Porting Quake to an iPod classic is no Easy Task

We didn’t think we’d see another hack involving the aging iPod Classic here on Hackaday again, yet [Franklin Wei] surprises us with a brand new port of Quake for the sixth-generation iPod released some thirteen years ago. Is Quake the new 90s FPS that’ll get put into every device hackers …read more

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Posted in fps, ipod, ipod hacks, quake, Rockbox, SDL, video games | Leave a comment

Mr. Carlson Gets Zapped by Snow

As a Canadian, [Mr. Carlson] knows a thing or two about extreme winter weather. Chances are good, though, that he never thought he’d get zapped with high voltage generated by falling snow.

[Mr. Carlson]’s shocking tale began with a quiet evening in his jam-packed lab as a snowstorm raged outside. …read more

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Posted in arc, discharge, high voltage, misc hacks, radio, RF, snow, statis, triboelectric, weather | Leave a comment

Failed: Air Umbrella

About five years ago, a Kickstarter popped up for the air umbrella. It wasn’t long before the project fell apart and the company made at least some refunds. Old news, we know. But [The Action Lab] recently explored the physics behind the air umbrella and why it wouldn’t be very …read more

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Posted in air umbrella, Crowd Funding, physics, rain, science, terminal velocity, umbrella | Leave a comment

Advanced Timber Architecture Gives New Life to Wooden Structures

When it comes to building materials, wood doesn’t always draw the most attention as the strongest in the bunch. That honor usually goes to concrete and steel – steel embedded in concrete provides support and a foundation for tall buildings, while concrete increases tensile strength and can be formed into …read more

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Posted in architecture, buildings, construction, Engineering, Timber, wood | Leave a comment

Little Hex Tricks Make Little Displays a Little Easier

Depending on the device in hand and one’s temperament, bringing up a new part can be a frolic through the verdant fields of discovery or an endless slog through the grey marshes of defeat. One of the reasons we find ourselves sticking with tried and true parts we know well …read more

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Posted in 7 segment, bit manipulation, bit twiddling, c++, computer hacks, excel, how-to, ISSI, led, Microcontrollers, registers, spreadsheet | Leave a comment

Robo Pony Greets Hackerspace Visitors

Robotic animal companions were once all the rage, though their limited personalities and annoying sound effects often relegated them to the bin fairly quickly. This makes them all the more ripe for hacking. [David Bynoe] had a Baby Butterscotch that was in need of a new home, and he decided …read more

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Posted in baby butterscotch, capacitive touch, pony, robot, toy hacks | Leave a comment

Broken 3D Printer Turned Scanning Microscope

A few years ago, [Wayne] managed to blow out the main board of his Flashforge Finder attempting to change the fan. He could have just fixed it of course, but where’s the fun in that? Instead, he’s used its mechanical components and a Raspberry Pi to create an impressive scanning …read more

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Posted in 3d printer, 3d Printer hacks, digital microphone, finder, microscope, tool hacks, usb microscope | Leave a comment

An Eight-Day Home Automation Hackathon is Inspiration for Getting More Projects Done

There’s nothing quite like a deadline to cut through extras and get right at the heart of the problem. Maybe we should all follow Interpreet’s example and stop thinking about automating our homes and just make it in an eight-day hackathon. His talk at the 2019 Hackaday Superconference covers the …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, cons, home automation, home hacks, internet of things, IoT, python, REST API | Leave a comment

New Part Day: LED Driver is FPGA Dev Board in Disguise

Our new part of the day is the ColorLight 5A-75B, a board that’s meant to drive eight of those ubiquitous high-density color LED panels over gigabit Ethernet. If you were building a commercial LED wall, you’d screw a bunch of the LED panels together, daisy-chain a bunch of these boards …read more

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Posted in dev kit, ECP5, fpga, Hackaday Columns, icestorm, open source, parts, reverse engineering | Leave a comment