Author Archives: Fernando Gomes

How Safe is That Ultrasonic Bath for Flux Removal?

How do you clean the residual flux off your boards? There are plenty of ways to go about the job, ranging from “why bother?” to the careful application of isopropyl alcohol to every joint with a cotton swab. It seems like more and more people are turning to ultrasonic cleaners …read more

Continue reading

Posted in cavitation, cleaning, flux, MEMS, misc hacks, pcb, removal, resonance, sonication, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Automated Cat Feeder Leaves Little to Chance

We often like to say that if something is worth doing, then it’s worth overdoing. This automatic cat feeder built by [krizzli] is a perfect example of the principle. It packs in far more sensors and functions than its simple and sleek outward appearance might suggest, to the point that …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Arduino Hacks, automation, cat feeder, home hacks, load cell, Microcontrollers, scale, stepper motor | Leave a comment

Don’t Forget The Baby!

It must be a common worry among parents, that they might forget their offspring and leave them in the car where they would succumb to excessive heat. So much so that [Matt Meerian] has produced an alarm that issues a verbal reminder to check for the youngster when the vehicle …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, atmega328, mp3, supercapacitor, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Retrotechtacular: The Gyro-X

In the 1950s, American automobiles bloomed into curvaceous gas-guzzlers that congested the roads. The profiles coming out of Detroit began to deflate in the 1960s, but many bloat boats were still sailing the streets. For all their hulking mass, these cars really weren’t all that stable — they still had …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Alex Tremulis, gyro-x, gyronaut x-1, gyroscopic car, Hackaday Columns, Lane Motor Museum, Retrotechtacular, Thomas Summers | Leave a comment

A STM32 Tonewheel Organ Without A Single Tonewheel

The one thing you might be surprised not to find in [Laurent]’s beautiful tonewheel organ build is any tonewheels at all.

Tonewheels were an early way to produce electronic organ sounds: by spinning a toothed wheel at different frequencies and transcending the signal one way or another it was possible …read more

Continue reading

Posted in digital audio hacks, midi, organ, stm32, synthesizer, tonewheel | Leave a comment

Building An Engine With An A/C Compressor

Air conditioning compressors aren’t exactly a mainstay of the average hacker’s junk box. Typically, they’re either fitted to a car to do their original job, or they’re on the bench getting refurbished. However, with the right mods, it’s possible to turn one into a functioning internal combustion engine.

The build …read more

Continue reading

Posted in compressor, engine, misc hacks, piston | Leave a comment

Start Your Day With The Mountain That Rises

Like many of us, [Zach Archer] enjoys the comfort of his darkened room so much that he has trouble getting up and facing the day. To make things a little easier for himself, he decided to put together a custom alarm clock that would fill his mornings with the glorious …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 3D printed enclosure, clock, clock hacks, e-ink, ESP32, led hacks, web interface | Leave a comment

Sara Adkins is Jamming Out with Machines

Asking machines to make music by themselves is kind of a strange notion. They’re machines, after all. They don’t feel happy or hurt, and as far as we know, they don’t long for the affections of other machines. Humans like to think of music as being a strictly human thing, …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, algorithm, cons, fft, machine learning, markov chains, midi, music, musical hacks, neural networks, Supercon | Leave a comment

The Story of A Secret Underground Parisian Society

Deep in the heart of Paris, a series of underground tunnels snakes across the city. They cross into unkept public spaces from centuries ago that have since vanished from collective memory – abandoned basements, catacombs, and subways hundreds of miles apart.

Only a few groups still traverse these subterranean streets. …read more

Continue reading

Posted in clock hacks, Hackaday Columns, horology, Paris, urban exploration | Leave a comment

[Ben Krasnow] Builds a Mass Spectrometer

One of the features that made Scientific American magazine great was a column called “The Amateur Scientist.” Every month, readers were treated to experiments that could be done at home, or some scientific apparatus that could be built on the cheap. Luckily, [Ben Krasnow]’s fans remember the series and urged …read more

Continue reading

Posted in ionization, isotope, magnetic, mass spectrometer, misc hacks, potassium, transimpedance, tungsten, vacuum | Leave a comment