Author Archives: Fernando Gomes

Add Scroll Wheels and Buttons to Smartphones with 3D-Printed Widgets Read by Accelerometer

The first LED digital wristwatches hit the market in the 1970s. They required a button push to turn the display on, prompting one comedian to quip that giving one to a one-armed man would be in poor taste. While the UIs of watches and other wearables have improved since then, …read more

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Posted in accelerometer, button, Cellphone Hacks, haptic, IMU, input, intertial measurement, phone, scroll wheel, smartphone, UI | Leave a comment

Mac Plus Becomes A Vector Display

The vintage Macintosh all-in-one computers were a design icon, as well as being highly useful machines in the 80s and 90s. In the decades since, they’ve been used for everything from web servers to aquariums, but that’s not all. [Arcade Jason] decided to grab an old Macintosh Plus and turn …read more

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Posted in Mac Hacks, macintosh, vector, vector display | Leave a comment

Play Dough Simplifies Interferometer Build

An interferometer sounds like something complicated, and in a way, it is. But it is also pretty easy to build one with some common materials. [Let’s Innovate] has instructions for how to make an interferometer using a green laser pointer, some mirrors, and a CD case. one of the most …read more

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Posted in green laser, interferometer, laser hacks, laser pointer, Michelson interferometer | Leave a comment

Building a Mag Lev Optical Table

When you’re talking about optics, things are often happening on a nanometer scale. This means that even the slightest amount of vibration can spoil delicate work. [The Thought Emporium] is working on a long-scale project to produce chocolate holograms, and needed a stable surface to set up some optical components. …read more

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Posted in laser, laser hacks, laser table, optical table | Leave a comment

Simulating the Enigma’s Oddball Cousin

Even if you wouldn’t describe yourself as a history buff, you’re likely familiar with the Enigma machine from World War II. This early electromechanical encryption device was used extensively by Nazi Germany to confound Allied attempts to eavesdrop on their communications, and the incredible effort put in by cryptologists such …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, alan turing, Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, encryption, enigma, The Hackaday Prize, world war II | Leave a comment

Thrust Vectoring With Compliant Mechanisms Is Hard

Thrust vectoring is one way to control aerial vehicles. It’s become more popular as technology advances, finding applications on fifth-generation fighter aircraft, as well as long being used in space programmes the world over.[RCLifeOn] decided to try and bring the technology to a prop-powered RC aircraft, in an unconventional way. …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, compliant mechanism, drone hacks, Thrust vectoring | Leave a comment

Cycloid Drawing Machine Uses Sneaky Stepper Hack

Stepper motors are great for projects that require accurate control of motion. 3D printers, CNC machines and plotters are often built using these useful devices. [InventorArtist] built a stepper-based cycloid drawing machine, and made use of a nifty little hack along the way.

The machine uses a rotating turntable to …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, cycloid, cycloidal, pantograph, spirograph, stepper motor | Leave a comment

The Smallest Hacker Camps Are The Most Satisfying, And You Can Do One Too

Two of my friends and I crammed into a small and aged European hatchback, drove all day along hundreds of miles of motorway, and finally through a succession of ever smaller roads. We were heading for a set of GPS co-ordinates in the north of Scotland, along with all of …read more

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Posted in CampGND, cons, hacker camp, Scotland, Scottish Consulate | Leave a comment

Enforce Speed Limits with a Rusty Bike

They say you can’t manage what you can’t measure, and that certainly held true in the case of this bicycle that was used to measure the speed of cars in one Belgian neighborhood. If we understand the translation from Dutch correctly, the police were not enforcing the speed limit despite …read more

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Posted in arduino, bicycle, bike, car, neighborhood, police, radar, radar gun, speed, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

Open Source Headset With Inside-Out Tracking, Video Passthrough

The folks behind the Atmos Extended Reality (XR) headset want to provide improved accessibility with an open ecosystem, and they aim to do it with a WebVR-capable headset design that is self-contained, 3D-printable, and open-sourced. Their immediate goal is to release a development kit, then refine the design for a …read more

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Posted in ar, Atmos, computer hacks, developer kit, Extended reality, eye tracking, hand tracking, head tracking, inside out tracking, Virtual Reality, vr, wearable hacks, XR | Leave a comment