Category Archives: 2019 Hackaday Prize

Go Back in Time with a Laser Cut Wood 3D Printer Kit

About a decade ago, the only way the average hacker was getting their hands on a desktop 3D printer was by building it themselves from a kit. Even then, to keep costs down, many of these kits were made out of laser cut wood. For a few years, wooden printers …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, 3d Printer hacks, cheap 3D printers, laser cut wood, Makerbot Cupcake, printrbot, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Modern Evolution of the Classic Water Rocket

Whether it was home-built from scraps or one of the various commercial versions that have popped over up over the years, there’s an excellent chance that the average Hackaday reader spent at least a couple of their more formative summers flying water rockets. You might not have realized it at …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, air-water rocket, Bluefruit, classic hacks, STEM education, The Hackaday Prize, water rocket | Leave a comment

Bringing Battle Bots into the Modern Classroom

With the wide array of digital entertainment that’s available to young students, it can be difficult for educators to capture their imagination. In decades past, a “volcano” made with baking soda and vinegar would’ve been enough to put a class of 5th graders on the edge of their seats, but …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, fighting robots, h-bridge motor controller, robotics, robots hacks, STEM education, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Tracking Stolen Bikes with Narrowband IoT

For his entry into the 2019 Hackaday Prize, [Marin Vukosav] is working on an ambitious project to create a small GPS tracking device which utilizes Narrowband IoT (NB-IoT) for long range communications. Rather than using a GSM modem which would suck the batteries dry in short order, NB-IoT can theoretically …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, bike, gps, narrowband, SIM7000, The Hackaday Prize, tracking device, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

A Cyclonic Vacuum Cleaner on a Hacker’s Budget

Have you ever seen a product in the store and been shocked at what the manufacturer was trying to charge for it? Since you’re reading Hackaday, we can safely assume the answer to that question; building a homebrew version of some commercial product for a fraction of its retail price …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, cyclonic, EDF, The Hackaday Prize, tool hacks, vacuum | Leave a comment

The Raspberry Pi Portable Console You Wish You Had

A retro game console is a fun all-arounder project. You’ve got electronics, mechanical design, and software considerations. For this year’s Hackaday Prize, is going all in. The Portable Retro Game Console with 7.9-inch Display is a work of art, and everything that a retro console could be.

This build is …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, console, Raspberry Pi, retro | Leave a comment

Perfecting the Open Source RC Controller

Over the last few months we’ve seen an influx of homebrew RC controllers come our way, and we’re certainly not complaining. While the prices of commercial RC transmitters are at an all-time low, and many of them can even run an open source firmware, there’s still nothing quite like building …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, dual screen, ESP32, FPV, MCP23017, rc controller, RC transmitter, The Hackaday Prize, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

A Full-Stack Web Browser

Interviewing to be a full-stack engineer is hard. It’s a lot harder than applying for a junior dev job where you’re asked to traverse a red-black tree on a whiteboard. For the full-stack job, they just give you a pile of 2N2222 transistors. (The first company wasn’t a great fit, …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, hardware, logic, rs232, The Hackaday Prize, ttl, vga | Leave a comment

A Customizable Open Source Mechanical Numpad

Mechanical keyboards with reduced key counts are all the rage these days, but while those streamlined input devices might look cool on your desk, there are times when the traditional number pad or navigation keys are quite handy. Rather than just going without, [Mattia Dal Ben] decided to put together …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, cherry mx, mechanical keyboard, numpad, peripherals hacks, QMK, RGB LED, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

A 32-bit Boost for Your 3D Printer

It might not be the kind of thing you’ve given much thought to, but if you’ve ever used a desktop 3D printer, it was almost certainly being controlled by an 8-bit CPU. In fact, the common RAMPS controller is essentially just a motor driver shield for the Arduino Mega. Surely …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, 3D Printer Controller, 3d Printer hacks, marlin, STM32F103, XT60 | Leave a comment