Category Archives: 2019 Hackaday Prize

LEGO-Based Robot Arm With Motion Planning

Robotic arms have found all manner of applications in industry. Whether its welding cars, painting cars, or installing dashboards in cars, robotic arms can definitely do the job. However, you don’t need to be a major automaker to experiment with the technology. You can build your own, complete with proper …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, Robot Operating System, robotic arm, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Building A Smart Speaker From Scratch

Smart speakers have proliferated since their initial launch earlier this decade. The devices combine voice recognition and assistant functionality with a foreboding sense that paying corporations for the privilege of having your conversations eavesdropped upon could come back to bite one day. For this reason, [Yihui] is attempting to build …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, alexa, Amazon Echo, google home, smart speaker, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

MIDI-Gurdy, MIDI-Gurdy, MIDI-Gurdy Man

The hurdy gurdy is the perfect musical instrument. It’s an instrument with a crank, and a mechanical wonderment of drone strings and weird chromatic keyboards. No other musical instrument combines the sweet drone of bagpipes with the aural experience of an eight-year-old attempting to play Hot Cross Buns on a …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, hurdy gurdy, HurdyGurdy, midi, musical hacks, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Extracting Power From USB Type C

For the last decade or so, we’ve been powering and charging our portable devices with USB. It’s a system that works; you charge batteries with DC, and you don’t want to have a wall wart for every device, so just grab a USB hub and charge your phone and you …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize, usb, USB Type-C, USB-PD | Leave a comment

The Flat-Pack 3D Printed Model

For a hundred years or thereabouts, if you made something out of plastic, you used a mold. Your part would come out of the mold with sprues and flash that had to be removed. Somewhere along the way, someone realized you could use these sprues to hold parts in a …read more

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Simulating the Enigma’s Oddball Cousin

Even if you wouldn’t describe yourself as a history buff, you’re likely familiar with the Enigma machine from World War II. This early electromechanical encryption device was used extensively by Nazi Germany to confound Allied attempts to eavesdrop on their communications, and the incredible effort put in by cryptologists such …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, alan turing, Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, encryption, enigma, The Hackaday Prize, world war II | Leave a comment

A Work Light For Hacker Events

If you’ve ever attended a hacker camp, you’ll know the problem of a field of tents lit only by the glow of laser illumination through the haze and set to the distant thump of electronic dance music. You need to complete that project, but the sun’s gone down and you …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, led, led hacks, light, lighting, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Linear CCDs Make For Better Cameras

Digital cameras have been around for forty years or so, and the first ones were built around CCDs. These were two-dimensional CCDs, and if you’ve ever looked inside a copier, scanner, or one of those weird handheld scanners from the 90s, you’ll find something entirely unlike what you’d see in …read more

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A Stylish Solution for Bike Navigation

[André Biagioni] is developing an open hardware bicycle navigation device called Aurora that’s so gorgeous it just might be enough to get you pedaling your way to work. This slick frame-mounted device relays information to the user through a circular array of SK6812 RGB LEDs, allowing you to find out …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, bike, bluetooth, compass, led hacks, nRF52832, sk6812, The Hackaday Prize, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

One Arduino Handheld to Rule Them All

There’s nothing quite as annoying as duplicated effort. Having to jump through the same hoops over and over again is a perfect way to burn yourself out, and might even keep you from tackling the project that’s been floating around in the back of your mind. [Alain Mauer] found that …read more

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Posted in 16x2 LCD, 2019 Hackaday Prize, Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, handheld, handhelds hacks, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment