Category Archives: arduino nano

It’s About Time We Saw Another Infinity Mirror Clock

Have you made an infinity mirror yet? They’re pretty much a rite of passage project at this point. But unlike that DIY power supply, most of them serve no function beyond looking cool (not that there’s anything wrong with that). Might as well make it do something, right?

[How …read more

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Posted in Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, clock, clock hacks, diy infinity mirror, infinity mirro clock, infinity mirror | Leave a comment

Five Channel Monitor Keeps Boat Batteries Shipshape

While those of us stuck sailing desks might not be able to truly appreciate the problem, [Timo Birnschein] was tired of finding that some of the batteries aboard his boat had gone flat. He wanted some way to check the voltage on all of the the batteries in the system …read more

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Posted in Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, battery monitor, marine, TFT display, transportation hacks, voltage | Leave a comment

DIY MIDI Looper Controller Looks Fantastic!

Due to pedalboard size, complicated guitar pedals sometimes reduce the number of buttons to the bare minimum. Many of these pedals are capable of being controlled with an external MIDI controller, however, and necessity being the mother of invention and all, this is a great opportunity to build something and …read more

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Posted in arduino, arduino nano, hardware, midi, midi controller, musical hacks | Leave a comment

The Next Generation Arduino Nano

While we certainly do love the Arduino Nano for its low-cost and versatility in projects, it’s unarguable that every tools has its gripes. For one maker in particular, there were enough complaints to merit a redesign of the entire board. While Arduino may or may not be interested in incorporating …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Mt Everest Lamp Recreates The Famous Peak

Anyone who has travelled to distant mountain peaks has marvelled at the beauty of the natural, rugged terrain. [apoorvas15] is no different, and created a lamp that celebrated the awe of the largest mountain on earth.

When it comes to reproducing an accurate geometrical representation of the landscape, the easiest …read more

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Posted in 3d Printer hacks, arduino nano, lamp, mount everest, mt everest, ws2812 | Leave a comment

Kinetic Lamp Sheds Light on Scientific Principles

This thing right here might be the coolest desk toy since Newton’s Cradle. It’s [Stephen Co]’s latest installment in a line of mesmerizing, zodiac-themed art lamps that started with the water-dancing Aquarius.  All at once, it demonstrates standing waves, persistence of vision, and the stroboscopic effect. And the best part? …read more

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Posted in apa102, Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, desk toy, POV, standing wave | Leave a comment

An MSX With A Nintendo Controller

Console owners inhabit their own individual tribes depending upon their manufacturer of choice, and so often never the twain shall meet. But sometimes there are those what-if moments, could Mario have saved the princess more quickly through PlayStation buttons, or how would Sonic the Hedgehog have been with a Nintendo …read more

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Posted in arduino nano, msx, n64, retrocomputing, retrogaming | Leave a comment

Persistence Of Vision On An Old Fan

Persistence of vision is a fun feature of the human visual system, which allows us to blink a bunch of spinning LEDs at the right time to spell out messages that appear to hang in the air. [TN_Inventor] took a stab at his own POV build, using an old desk …read more

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Posted in arduino nano, led, led hacks, persistence of vision, POV | Leave a comment

Simple Simon Says Looks Sharp

Simon was a popular toy, launching at the very end of the 1970s, and cribbed from earlier work by Atari with their game Touch Me. The gameplay is simple, and while we suspect it won’t last quite as long as the several thousand years we’ve so far had chess, it’s …read more

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Posted in arduino nano, classic hacks, game, simon | Leave a comment

Simulating the Enigma’s Oddball Cousin

Even if you wouldn’t describe yourself as a history buff, you’re likely familiar with the Enigma machine from World War II. This early electromechanical encryption device was used extensively by Nazi Germany to confound Allied attempts to eavesdrop on their communications, and the incredible effort put in by cryptologists such …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, alan turing, Arduino Hacks, arduino nano, encryption, enigma, The Hackaday Prize, world war II | Leave a comment