Category Archives: camera

Get Your Hands on a 2017 Hackaday Superconference Badge

We just got the shipment of hot Hackaday Superconference badges in our hands yesterday, and they’re frankly awesome. Due to great manufacturing partners and a fantastic design by [Mike Harrison], we ended up with too few manufacturing defects and too many badges. How’s that for a nice problem to have?

But our gain is your gain! We have enough badges for everyone who’s coming to the con, and we’re selling the rest on Tindie.

In case you missed it, the badge is a digital video camera, or at least that’s how it’s going to start out its life. It’s got …read more

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Posted in 2017 Hackaday Superconference, badge, badgelife, buy, camera, cons, Mike Harrison, Tindie, video | Leave a comment

Immersive VR with a 200-Degree Stereoscopic Camera

VR is in vogue, but getting on board requires a steep upfront cost. Hackaday.io user [Colin Pate] felt that $800 was a bit much for even the cheapest commercial 360-degree 3D camera, so he thought: ‘why not make my own for half that price?’

[Pate] knew he’d need a lot of bandwidth and many GPIO ports for the camera array, so he searched out the Altera Cyclone V SOC FPGA and a Terasic DE10-Nano development board to host it. At present, he has four Uctronics OV5642 cameras on his rig, chosen for their extensive documentation and support. The camera mount …read more

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Posted in 360 Photo, camera, FPGA, photography, stereoscopic, Virtual Reality, vr | Leave a comment

Hyperspectral Imaging – Seeing the Unseeable

They say that a picture is with worth a thousand words. But what is an image exactly? One way ideal would be a perfect reflection of what we see. But our view of the natural world is constrained to a bandwidth of 400 to 700 nanometers within the electromagnetic spectrum, so our cameras produce images within this same bandwidth.

For example, if I take a picture of a yellow flower with my phone, the image will look just about how I saw with my own eyes. But what if we could see the flower from a different part of the …read more

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Posted in agriculture, camera, digital cameras hacks, drone, farm, Featured, hyperspectral, Imaging | Leave a comment

Winch Bot Records Hacks and Cats

Some people are better than others when it comes to documenting their hacks. Some people, like [Micah Elizabeth Scott], aka [scanlime], set the gold standard with their recordings. Hacking sessions with the Winch Bot have been streamed regularly throughout the build and this is going to lead to a stacking effect in her next projects because the Winch Bot was designed to record hacking sessions. Hacking video inception anyone? Her Winch Bot summary video is after the break.

The first part of this build, which she calls the Tuco Flyer, was [Micah Elizabeth Scott]’s camera gimbal hack which we already …read more

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Posted in audio visual, camera, delta, documentation, gimbal, position, positioning, recording, robot, robots hacks, video, winch | Leave a comment

Tracing A Scene An Old-Fashioned Way

Taking a picture is as simple as tapping a screen. Drawing a memorable scene, even when it’s directly in front of you, is a different skill entirely. So trace it! Well, that’s kind of hard to do without appropriate preparation.

[bobsteaman]’s method is to first whip up a pantograph — it tested well with a felt marker on the end. Next, he built a camera obscura into a small wood box with a matte plexiglass top, which didn’t work quite so well. A magnifying glass above the camera’s pinhole aperture helped, but arduous testing was needed to ensure it was …read more

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Posted in art, camera, linkage, misc hacks, Obscura, pantograph, picture, pinhole, plexiglass, tracing | Leave a comment

A Compact, Portable Pantograph Camera Slider

Ho, hum, another camera slider, right? Wrong — here’s a camera slider with a literal twist.

What sets [Schijvenaars]’ slider apart from the pack is that it’s not a slider, at least not in the usual sense. A slider is a mechanical contrivance that allows a camera to pan smoothly during a shot. Given that the object is to get a camera from point A to point B as smoothly as possible, and that sliders are often used for long exposures or time-lapse shots, the natural foundation for them is a ball-bearing linear slide, often powered by a stepper motor …read more

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Posted in camera, camera slider, digital cameras hacks, misc hacks, pan, panning, pantograph, slider, timing belt | Leave a comment

Live Stream to YouTube by Pointing a Box and Pressing a Button

YouTube has the ability to do live streaming, but [Tinkernut] felt that the process could be much more straightforward. From this desire to streamline was born the Raspberry Pi based YouTube live streaming camera. It consists of a Raspberry Pi with some supporting hardware and it has one job: to make live streaming as simple as pointing a box and pressing a button. The hardware is mostly off-the-shelf, and once all the configuration is done the unit provides a simple touchscreen based interface to preview, broadcast live, and shut down. The only thing missing is a 3D printed enclosure, which …read more

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Posted in camera, digital cameras hacks, diy, how-to, Raspberry Pi, software, streaming, touchscreen, youtube | Leave a comment

Manually-Adjustable Three-Axis Gimbal

[Tim Good] built a 3-axis gimbal out of 3D-printed and machined pieces, and the resulting design is pretty sweet, with a nice black-on-black look. He machined the flat pieces because they were too long to be printed in his 3D-printer.

The various axes swivel on four bearings each, and each ring features a manual locking mechanism made out of steel stainless pins that immobilize each axis. The gimbal operation itself appears to be manual. That said, [Tim] used 12-wire slip rings to power whatever camera gets mounted on it–it looks like the central enclosure could hold a camera the size …read more

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Posted in camera, gimbal, misc hacks | Leave a comment

Hackaday Prize Entry: FabDoc is Version Control for Project Images

FabDoc is an interesting concept that attempts to tackle a problem many of us didn’t realize we had. There are plenty of version control systems for software, but many projects also have a hardware element or assembly process. Those physical elements need to be documented, but that process does not easily fit the tools that make software development and collaboration easier. [Kevin Cheng] sums FabDoc up as “a system to capture time-lapse pictures as pre-commits.”

With FabDoc a camera automatically records the physical development process, allowing the developer to focus on work and review later. The images from the camera …read more

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Posted in camera, documentation, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero, The Hackaday Prize, time-lapse, version control | Leave a comment

Handheld Gimbal with Off-The-Shelf Parts

For anything involving video capture while moving, most videographers, cinematographers, and camera operators turn to a gimbal. In theory it is a simple machine, needing only three sets of bearings to allow the camera to maintain a constant position despite a shifting, moving platform. In practice it’s much more complicated, and gimbals can easily run into the thousands of dollars. While it’s possible to build one to reduce the extravagant cost, few use 100% off-the-shelf parts like [Matt]’s handheld gimbal.

[Matt]’s build was far more involved than bolting some brackets and bearings together, though. Most gimbals for filming are powered, …read more

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Posted in camera, gimbal, handheld, off the shelf, video, video hacks | Leave a comment