Category Archives: chemistry hacks

Loads of Testing Yields New, Reliable, and Cheap Leather Hardening Technique

Leather hardening has been around for such a long time that one might think that there was little left to discover, but [Jason F. Timmermans] certainly showed that is not the case. Right around the end of 2018 he set up experiments to compare different techniques for hardening leather, and …read more

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Posted in chemistry hacks, classic hacks, cuir boulli, hardening, leather, leather crafting, science, stearic acid, testing | Leave a comment

Make An Electroplating Marker, Because Plating Complex Objects Is Hard

If an object is conductive or has been given a conductive coating, it can be given a metal skin via electroplating. Electroplating is a simple process that is perfectly accessible to anyone in possession of vinegar, salt, a power supply, and some metal such as copper or nickel.

The process …read more

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Posted in 3d printed, 3d Printer hacks, brush plating, chemistry hacks, copper, electrolyte bath, electroplating, electroplating marker, nickel | Leave a comment

Nanoparticles Make Mega Difference for “Unweldable” Aluminum

Though much of it is hidden from view, welding is a vital part of society. It’s the glue that holds together the framework of the cars we drive, the buildings we occupy, the appliances we use, and the heavy machinery that keeps us moving forward. Every year, the tireless search …read more

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Posted in aluminium, arc welding, chemistry hacks, Engineering, Featured, filler rod, nanoparticles, TIG welding, welding | Leave a comment

Hydrogen Desk Cannon Is Fun With Electricity and Water

Water is a stable chemical, but with the addition of a little electricity, it can be split into its component parts. The result is just the right mix of H2 and O2 to convert back into water with a bang. [Peter Sripol] has built a charming desktop cannon …read more

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Posted in cannon, chemistry hacks, oxyhydrogen, rocket | Leave a comment

Anodize Aluminum Easily

We’ve all seen brightly-colored pieces of aluminum and can identify them as anodized. But what does that mean, exactly? A recent video from [Ariel Yahni] starring [Wawa] — a four-legged assistant — shows how to create pieces like this yourself. You can see [Wawa’s] new dog tag, below.

[Ariel] found …read more

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Posted in aluminum, anodising, anodizing, chemistry hacks, drain cleaner, lye, sulfuric acid | Leave a comment

How Do You Etch Something You Can’t Move?

We probably don’t need to tell this to the average Hackaday reader, but we’re living in a largely disposable society. Far too many things are built as cheaply as possible, either because manufacturers know you won’t keep it for long, or because they don’t want you to. Of course, the choice if yours if you wish to you accept this lifestyle or not.

Like many of us, [Erik] does not. When the painted markings on his stove become so worn that he couldn’t see them clearly, he wasn’t about to hop off to the appliance store to buy a new …read more

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Posted in appliances, chemistry hacks, electroetching, etching, kitchen, marking | Leave a comment

Spectrometer Is Inexpensive And Capable

We know the effect of passing white light through a prism and seeing the color spectrum that comes out of the other side. It will not be noticeable to the naked eye, but that rainbow does not fully span the range of [Roy G. Biv]. There are narrowly absent colors which blur together, and those missing portions are a fingerprint of the matter the white light is passing through or bouncing off. Those with a keen eye will recognize that we are talking about spectrophotometry which is identifying those fingerprints and determining what is being observed and how much is …read more

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Posted in chemistry hacks, equipment, how-to, lab, laboratory, laboratory equipment, spectrometer, spectrophotometry, UV/Vis | Leave a comment

A Crash Course In 3D Printed Venturi Pumps

Venturi pumps, commonly referred to as aspirators, are a fantastic way of moving around things which you might not want spinning around inside of a pump, and one of the easiest ways to create a vacuum. According to his research, [Tuval Ben Dosa] believed such a device would be a good way to move corrosive gasses which would normally eat up a blower fan; all he had to do was figure out how to 3D print one to his specifications.

Put simply: if you take a “T” shaped pipe and pass a fluid (such as air or water) through the …read more

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Posted in 3d Printer hacks, aspirator, chemistry hacks, chlorine gas, classic hacks, fume extractor, vacuum, Venturi, venturi effect | Leave a comment

Make Your Own Phosphorescent Material

Phosphors are key to a whole swathe of display and lighting technologies. Cathode ray tubes, vacuum fluorsecent displays, and even some white LEDs all use phosphors to produce light. [Hydrogen Time] decided to make a green phosphorescent material, and has shared the process on Youtube, embedded below.

The aim is to produce zinc sulfide crystals doped with copper impurities. This creates a phosphor with a familiar green glow. [Hydrogen Time] starts by noting that it’s important to make sure all chemicals used are of good quality, as even slight impurities can spoil the final product.

Zinc sulfide is made into …read more

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Posted in Chemistry, chemistry hacks, phosphor | Leave a comment

Open Source Biological Gear For the Masses

At the risk of putting too fine a point on it, Hackaday exists because people are out there building and documenting open source gadgets. If the person who built a particular gizmo is willing to show the world how they did it, consider us interested. Since you’re reading this, we’ll assume you are as well. Over the years, this mentality has been spreading out from the relatively niche hacker community into the greater engineering world, and we couldn’t be happier.

Case in point, the Poseidon project created at the California Institute of Technology. Developed by students [Sina Booeshaghi], [Eduardo Beltrame], …read more

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Posted in Arduino Hacks, biology, chemistry hacks, microfluidics, microscope, Raspberry Pi, science, syringe pump | Leave a comment