Category Archives: chemistry hacks

Casein, Cello, Carrotinet, and Copper Oxide, Science Grab Bag

One of our favorite turnips, oops, citizen scientists [The Thought Emporium], has released his second Grab Bag video which can also be seen after the break. [The Thought Emporium] dips into a lot of different disciplines as most of us are prone to do. Maybe one of his passions will get your creative juices flowing and inspire your next project. Or maybe it will convince some clever folks to take better notes so they can share with the rest of the world.

Have you ever read a recipe and thought, “What if I did the complete opposite?” In chemistry lab …read more

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Posted in astrophotography, casein, cello, chemistry hacks, clarinet, conductive, conductive paint, crystal garden, music, musical hacks, vegetable | Leave a comment

More Homemade PCB Tinning

[Marko] styles himself as a crazy chemist. His video showing a fast tin plating solution for PCBs (YouTube, see below) doesn’t seem so crazy. We will admit, though, it uses some things that you might have to search for.

The formula calls for stannous chloride — you could probably make this by dissolving tin in hydrochloric acid. There’s also thiourea — the main chemical in silver-cleaning dips like Tarn-X. Sulphuric acid and deionized water round out the recipe.

It probably goes without saying, that you shouldn’t be handling these nasty chemicals without the right set up and a good idea …read more

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Posted in chemistry hacks, pcb, Printed Circuit Board, tin plating, tinning | Leave a comment

How Pure is this Cup of Joe? Coffee, Conspiracy, and Citizen Science

Have you ever thought about coffee purity? It’s more something you’d encounter with prescription or elicit drugs, but coffee is actually a rather valuable commodity. If a seller can make the actual grounds go a bit further by stretching the brew with alternative ingredients there becomes an incentive to cheat.

If this sounds like the stuff rumors are made of, that’s because it is! Here in Ho Chi Minh City there are age-old rumors a coffee syndicate that masterfully passes off adulterated product as pure, high-grade coffee. Rumors are one thing, but the local media started picking up on these …read more

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Posted in artificial flavor, Chemistry, chemistry hacks, coffee, Featured, Ho Chi Minh City, Interest, purity, titration | Leave a comment

Yellowing: the Plastic Equivalent of a Sunburn

Your fancy white electronic brick of consumer electronics started off white, but after some time it yellowed and became brittle. This shouldn’t have happened; plastic is supposed to last forever. It turns out that plastic enclosures are vulnerable to the same things as skin, and the effects are similar. Whey they are stared at by the sun, the damage is done even though it might not be visible to you for quite some time.

Photodegradation

Photodegradation is nature’s way of saying you should be playing more video games indoors instead of being outside. The process is complicated and full of …read more

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Posted in Chemistry, chemistry hacks, classic hacks, Featured, hydrogen peroxide, Interest, plastic, restoration, retr0brite, retrobright, vintage, yellow plastic | Leave a comment

Coffee, Conspiracy, and Citizen Science: An Introduction to Iodometry

I take coffee very seriously. It’s probably the most important meal of the day, and apparently the largest overall dietary source of antioxidants in the United States of America. Regardless of whether you believe antioxidants have a health effect (I’m skeptical), that’s interesting!

Unfortunately, industrially roasted and ground coffee is sometimes adulterated with a variety of unwanted ‘other stuff’: corn, soybeans, wheat husks, etc. Across Southeast Asia, there’s a lot of concern over food adulteration and safety in general, as the cost-driven nature of the market pushes a minority of vendors to dishonest business practices. Here in Vietnam, one of …read more

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Posted in analytical chemistry, chemistry hacks, coffee, Hackaday Columns, health, home hacks, Interest, iodometry | Leave a comment

Restoring a Tonka Truck With Science

The yellow Tonka Truck. Instantly recognizable by any child of decades past, that big metal beast would always make you popular around the sandbox. There were no blinking lights to dazzle, no noises to be heard (unless you count the hard plastic wheels rolling on concrete), even the dumping action is completely manual. But back then, it was a possession to be treasured indeed.

So it’s perhaps no surprise that there is a certain following for these classic trucks today, though like with most other collectibles, a specimen in good condition can be prohibitively expensive. The truck that [PoppaFixIt] found …read more

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Posted in chemistry hacks, classic hacks, electrolytic rust removal, restoration, Tonka, toy, toy hacks | Leave a comment

Chemotransfer for DIY PCBs

Making PCBs with the toner transfer method has been around since you could buy your traces at Radio Shack. There are a million techniques for removing copper from sheets of fiberglass, from milling to using resist pens, to the ubiquitous laser printer toner transfer. Here’s a technique we haven’t seen before. [Darko Volk] is calling this ‘chemotransfer’. It’s mostly a laser printer toner transfer process, but the toner is transferred from paper to copper with the help of a special mix of solvents.

This chemotransfer process is almost identical to the usual process of making a toner transfer PCB. First, …read more

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Posted in chemistry hacks, etching, pcb, pcb drill, toner transfer | Leave a comment

Carbon Quantum Dots in Your Favorite Color

Citizen scientist extraordinaire [Thought Emporium] put out a new video about colorful quantum dots which can be seen below the break. Quantum dots are a few nanometers wide and you can tell which size they are by which color they fluoresce. Their optical and electrical properties vary proportionally with size so red will behave differently than purple but we doubt they will taste like “cherry” and  “grape.” Let’s not find out. This makes sense when you realize that a diamond will turn into black powder if you pulverize it. Carbon is funny like that.

[Thought Emporium] uses the video for …read more

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Posted in carbon, carbon dots, carbon quantum dots, chemistry hacks, color, dots, news, pigment, quantum | Leave a comment

Making Ice Cream With Heavy Metal

After his last project left him with an eleven-pound block of aluminum, [Jason] got to thinking of what most of us would in that situation: fresh made ice cream. His mind was on the frozen concoctions of the aptly named Cold Stone Creamery, a mall food court staple where a chilled stone is used to turn fresh ingredients into made to order sundaes.

[Jason] did the math and found that an eleven-pound chunk of aluminum can absorb a little over 67,000 joules, which is over twice the energy required to freeze 100 g of water. In place of water he …read more

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Posted in chemistry hacks, food, home hacks, ice cream, thermal conductivity, thermal inertia | Leave a comment

Cheap and Easy Magnetic DNA Separation Method Needs Your Help

When you consider that almost every single cell in your body has more than a meter of DNA coiled up inside its nucleus, it seems like it should be pretty easy to get some to study. But with all the other cellular gunk in a crude preparation, DNA can be quite hard to isolate. That’s where this cheap and easy magnetic DNA separation method comes in. If it can be optimized and tested with some help from the citizen science community.

Commercial DNA separation methods generally involve mixing silica beads into crude cell fractions; the DNA preferentially binds to the …read more

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Posted in ammonia, beads, biohacks, chemistry hacks, dna, ferric chloride, ferrous sulfate, magnetite, magnets, silca, waterglass | Leave a comment