Category Archives: e-ink

E-Book Reader Gets Page Turn Buttons, Is None The Wiser

Most e-book readers don’t have physical page turn buttons. Why? They just don’t. Virtual page turns are accomplished with a tap at a screen edge. Determined to reduce the awkwardness of one-handed use, [Sagar Vaze] modified a Kobo e-reader with two physical page turn buttons as a weekend project.

[Sagar] …read more

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Posted in e-book, e-ink, handhelds hacks, how-to, ir, kobo, multitouch hacks, reader, spoof, touch sensing | Leave a comment

Open Hardware E-Ink Display Just Needs an Idea

Its taken awhile, but thanks to devices like the Amazon Kindle, the cost of e-ink displays are finally at the point where mere mortals such as us can actually start using them in our projects. Now we’ve just got to figure out how to utilize them properly. Sure you can …read more

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Posted in bluetooth low energy, digital signage, e-ink, e-paper, hardware, nRF52840, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

E-Ink Price Tags Fall Off Store Shelves Onto Your Workbench

There’s always a magic moment for our community in the lifecycle of any piece of technology: the point at which it first becomes available for pennies on the surplus market. Something which could previously be had only at a price is rendered down to mere pennies, and we are free …read more

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Posted in e-ink, e-ink display, e-ink price tag, parts | Leave a comment

Get Organized With This Raspberry Pi E-Ink Calendar

Like many hackers, we love e-ink. There’s something mesmerizing and decidedly futuristic about the way the images shift around and reconstitute themselves. Like something from Harry Potter, but that you can buy on Alibaba instead of from a shop in Diagon Alley. But as anyone who’s used the technology can tell you, the low refresh rate of an e-ink screen limits its potential applications. It works great for reading books, but beyond that its struggled to find its niche in a world of cheap LCDs.

But [Zonglin Li] has recently wrapped up a project which shows that e-ink has …read more

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Posted in calendar, e-ink, parts, python 3, Raspberry Pi, waveshare | Leave a comment

The Very Slow Movie Player Does it With E-Ink

Most displays are looking to play things faster. We’ve got movies at 60 frames per second, and gaming displays that run at 144 fps. But what about moving in the other direction? [Bryan Boyer] wanted to try this out, so he built the VSMP, or Very Slow Movie Player. It’s a neat device that plays back a movie at about 24 fph (frames per hour) on an e-ink display to demonstrate something that [Bryan] calls Slow Seeing, which, he says “helps you see yourself against the smear of time.” A traditional epic-length movie is now going to run you greater …read more

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Posted in art, e-ink, Raspberry Pi, slow motion, slow video, stop motion, time-lapse, video hacks | Leave a comment

Using E-Paper Displays for an Electronic Etch A Sketch

Electronic things are often most successful when they duplicate some non-electronic thing. Most screens, then, are poor replacements for paper. Except, of course, for E-paper. These displays have high contrast even in sunlight and they hold their image even with no power. When [smbakeryt] was looking at his daughter’s Etch-a-Sketch, he decided duplicating its operation would be a great way to learn about these paper-like displays.

You can see a video of his results and his findings below. He bought several displays and shows them all, including some three-color units which add a single spot color. The one thing you’ll …read more

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Posted in e-ink, e-paper, etch a sketch, Raspberry Pi | Leave a comment

Corporate Badgelife: Oracle’s Code Card

We tend to think of elaborate electronic conference badges as something limited to the hacker scene, but it looks like the badgelife movement is starting to hit the big time. Now even the “big boys” are getting into the act, and pretty soon you won’t be able to go to a stuffy professional conference without seeing a sea of RGB LEDs firing off. We’ll let the good readers of Hackaday determine if this means it’s officially post-cool or not.

[Noel Portugal] writes in to tell us about how he created the “Code Card” during his tenure with the Oracle Groundbreakers …read more

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Posted in badgelife, cloud, cons, e-ink, ESP8266, grove, hardware, wearable hacks, web application | Leave a comment