Category Archives: eda

Hackaday Links: March 15, 2020

Just a few weeks ago in the Links article, we ran a story about Tanner Electronics, the Dallas-area surplus store that was a mainstay of the hacker and maker scene in the area. At the time, Tanner’s owners were actively looking for a new, downsized space to move into, and …read more

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Posted in Covid-19, eda, Eric S Raymond, ESR, gears, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links, involute, mars, mocap, motion capture, open source, osd, OSI, PCD, rover, surplus, Tanner | Leave a comment

KiCad Action Plugins

The last two years has been a particularly exciting time for KiCad, for users, casual contributors, and for the core developers too. Even so, there are many cool new features that are still in process. One bottleneck with open-source development of complex tools like KiCad is the limited amount of …read more

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Posted in Action Plugins, eda, Hackaday Columns, KiCAD, python, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Byte Sized Pieces Help The KiCad Go Down

It’s no surprise that we here at Hackaday are big fans of Fritzing KiCad. But to a beginner (or a seasoned veteran!) the learning curve can be cliff-like in its severity. In 2016 we published a piece linking to project by friend-of-the-Hackaday [Chris Gammell] called Contextual Electronics, his project to …read more

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Posted in Chris Gammell, contextual electronics, eda, instruction, KiCAD, layout, learning, libre eda, pcb, schematic, tool hacks, tutorials | Leave a comment

KiCon Gets Our KiCad Conference On

Oh, what’s KiCon you say? KiCon is the first dedicated conference on our favorite libre EDA tool: KiCad, organized by friend of Hackaday Chris Gammell and scheduled for April 26 and 27th in Chicago.

Having stuffed ourselves full of treats through the holidays, followed by sleeping through the calm winter …read more

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Posted in Bring A Hack, conference, cons, eda, KiCAD | Leave a comment

Advanced Techniques For Using Git With KiCAD

For most developers “distributed version control” probably means git. But by itself git doesn’t work very well with binary files such as images, zip files and the like because git doesn’t know how to make sense of the structure of an arbitrary blobs of bytes. So when trying to figure out how to track changes in design files created by most EDA tools git doesn’t get the nod and designers can be trapped in SVN hell. It turns out though KiCAD’s design files may not have obvious extensions like .txt, they are fundamentally text files (you might know that if …read more

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Posted in eda, Git, KiCAD, misc hacks, tool hacks | Leave a comment