Category Archives: fpga

Supercon Keynote: Megan Wachs Breaks Down RISC-V

The 2019 Hackaday Superconference kicked off with a marvelous, and marvelously geeky, keynote talk on the subject of RISC-V by Dr. Megan Wachs. She is VP of Engineering at SiFive, a company that makes RISC-V processors in silicon, but the talk is a much more general introduction to the RISC-V …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, cons, Featured, fpga, isa, keynote, Megan Wachs, Microcontrollers, RISC-V, SiFive | Leave a comment

New Part Day: LED Driver is FPGA Dev Board in Disguise

Our new part of the day is the ColorLight 5A-75B, a board that’s meant to drive eight of those ubiquitous high-density color LED panels over gigabit Ethernet. If you were building a commercial LED wall, you’d screw a bunch of the LED panels together, daisy-chain a bunch of these boards …read more

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Posted in dev kit, ECP5, fpga, Hackaday Columns, icestorm, open source, parts, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

Using Lookup Tables to Make the Impossible Possible

Embarrassing confession time: I never learned my multiplication tables in grade school. Sure, I had the easy tables like the twos and the fives down, but if asked what 4 x 7 or 8 x 6 was, I’d draw a blank. As you can imagine, that made me a less …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, cons, dictionary, fpga, hash, lookup tables, LUTs, Microcontrollers | Leave a comment

36C3: Open Source is Insufficient to Solve Trust Problems in Hardware

With open source software, we’ve grown accustomed to a certain level of trust that whatever we are running on our computers is what we expect it to actually be. Thanks to hashing and public key signatures in various parts in the development and deployment cycle, it’s hard for a third …read more

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Posted in 36C3, cons, fpga, hardware security, open source, open source hardware, security hacks, trust | Leave a comment

2019: As the Hardware World Turns

Well, this is it. The end of the decade. In a few days the 2010s will be behind us, and a lot of very smug people will start making jokes on social media about how we’re back in the “Roaring 20s” again. Only this time around there’s a lot more …read more

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Posted in 3d prining, alexa, boeing, commercial space, Current Events, fpga, Hackaday Columns, Interest, internet of things, led bulb, Original Art, security, Supercon badge | Leave a comment

David Williams Is “FPGA-Curious”

If you hadn’t noticed, we had a bit of an FPGA theme running at this year’s Superconference. Why? Because the open-source FPGA toolchain is ripening, and because many of the problems that hackers (and academics) are tackling these days have become complex enough to warrant using them. A case in …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, cons, fpga, hardware, robotics | Leave a comment

A Fantastic Frontier of FPGA Flexibility Found in the 2019 Supercon Badge

We have just concluded a successful Hackaday Superconference where a highlight for many was digging into this year’s hardware badge. Shaped in the general form of a Game Boy handheld gaming console, the heart of the badge is a large FPGA opening up new and exciting potential for badge hacking. …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, badge hacking, conference badges, cons, Current Events, Featured, fpga, fpga board, FPGAs, Hackaday SuperConference, Superconference | Leave a comment

A Scratch-built RISC-V CPU in an FPGA

“RISC architecture is going to change everything”, which is why [SHAOS] is building this cool RISC-V DIY retro-style computer.

The project took inspiration from another hacker’s work in building a RISC-V emulator; shared in the Hackaday FPGA chat. He took it a bit further and got it going on an …read more

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Posted in emulate, fpga, lattice, RISC-V, RISCV, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019 | Leave a comment

Speeding Up IOTA Proof Of Work Using FPGAs

Blockchain has existed as a concept since the early 1990s, but keeping a distributed ledger for IoT transactions wasn’t widely implemented until IOTA developed Tangle. The blockchain company was initially founded as a hardware startup and pivoted to work on transactional settlement for IoT. The Tangle, their distributed ledger architecture …read more

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Posted in cryptocurrency, fpga, iota | Leave a comment

Gigantic FPGA in a Game Boy Form Factor, 2019 Supercon Badge is a Hardware Siren Song

Look upon this conference badge and kiss your free time goodbye. The 2019 Hackaday Superconference badge is an ECP5 FPGA running a RISC-V core in a Game Boy form factor complete with cartridge slot that is more open than anything we’ve ever seen before: multiple open-source CPU designs were embedded …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, badge, badgelife, cons, Featured, fpga, Supercon | Leave a comment