Category Archives: Hackaday Columns

Review: SMD Tweezer Meter or Tweezer Probes For Your Multimeter?

It’s remarkable how tiny electronics have become. Heaven knows what an old-timer whose experience started with tubes must think, to go from solder tags to SMD in a lifetime is some journey. Even  the generation that started with discrete transistors has lived through an incredible shift. But it’s true, SMD components are tiny, and that presents a challenge aside from the one you’ll face when soldering them. Identifying and measuring the value of a chip component too small to have any writing upon it becomes almost impossible with a pair of standard test probes.

Happily the test equipment manufacturers have …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Hackaday Columns, reviews, smd, smd meter, smd tweezers, test equipment, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Hackaday Links: July 15, 2018

Have you tried Altium CircuitMaker? Uh, you probably shouldn’t. [Dave] of EEVBlog fame informs us via a reliable source that CircuitMaker is intentionally crippled by adding a random sleep on high pad-count boards. The hilarious pseudocode suggested on the forum is if ((time.secs % 3) == 0) delayMicroseconds(padCount * ((rand() % 20) + 1));.Now, this is a rumor, however, I would assume [Dave] has a few back channels to Altium. Also, this assertation is supported by the documentation for CircuitStudio, which says, “While there are no ‘hard limits’ per se, the software has been engineered to make it impractical …read more

Continue reading

Posted in arm, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links, patent, RISC-V, wired, XYZ Printing | Leave a comment

This Is Your Last Chance To Design The Greatest In Power Harvesting

This is your last weekend to get your project together for the Power Harvesting Challenge in this year’s Hackaday Prize. We’re looking for projects that harvest energy from the ether, and power electronics from solar, thermal, wind, light, or random electromagnetic fluctuations. Is it going to save the world? Maybe, but it’s a great excuse to build some really cool electronics. If you have an idea in mind, this is your last weekend to enter it in the Power Harvesting Challenge.

The Hackaday community has thrown itself full-force into the Hackaday Prize, and there are hundreds of projects entered in …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2018 Hackaday Prize, Hackaday Columns, Power Harvesting Challenge, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

The Bad Old Days of Telephone Answering Machines

Telephone answering machines were almost a fad. They were hindered for years by not being allowed to connect to the phone lines. Then a mix of cell phones and the phone company offering voicemail made the machines all but obsolete. Unless you are really young, you probably had one at some point though. Some had digital outgoing messages and a tape to record. Some had two tapes. But did you ever have one that didn’t connect to the phone line at all? Remember, there was a time when they couldn’t. My family had one of these growing up and after …read more

Continue reading

Posted in answering machine, Hackaday Columns, history, Original Art, phone hacks, telephone answering machine | Leave a comment

ERRF 18: Slice Engineering Shows off the Mosquito

With few exceptions, it seemed like every 3D printer at the first inaugural East Coast RepRap Festival (ERRF) was using a hotend built by E3D. There’s nothing inherently wrong with that; E3D makes solid open source products, and they deserve all the success they can get. But that being said, competition drives innovation, so we’re particularly interested anytime we see a new hotend that isn’t just an E3D V6 clone.

The Mosquito from Slice Enginerring is definitely no E3D clone. In fact, it doesn’t look much like any 3D printer hotend you’ve ever seen before. Tiny and spindly, the look …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 3d Printer hacks, cons, E3D, ERRF, ERRF 18, Hackaday Columns, hardware, heatsink, hotend, mosquito | Leave a comment

Friday Hack Chat: Hacking Voice Assistants

The future of consumer electronics is electronic voice assistants, at least that’s what the manufacturers are telling us. Everything from Alexas to Google Homes to Siris are invading our lives, and if predictions hold, your next new car might just have a voice assistant in it. It’s just a good thing we have enough samples of Majel Barrett’s voice for a quality virtual assistant.

For this week’s Hack Chat, we’re going to be talking all about voice interfaces. There are hundreds of Alexa and Google Home hacks around, but this is just the tip of the iceberg. What else can …read more

Continue reading

Posted in alexa, google home, Hack Chat, Hackaday Columns, siri, voice assistant | Leave a comment

Putting More Tech Into More Hands: The Robin Hoods of Hackaday Prize

Many different projects started with the same thought: “That’s really expensive… I wonder if I could build my own for less.” Success is rewarded with satisfaction on top of the money saved, but true hacker heroes share their work so that others can build their own as well. We are happy to recognize such generosity with the Hackaday Prize [Robinhood] achievement.

Achievements are a new addition to our Hackaday Prize, running in parallel with our existing judging and rewards process. Achievements are a way for us to shower recognition and fame upon creators who demonstrate what we appreciate from our …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2018 Hackaday Prize, 3d printer, air pressure, AMS, cnc, CNC router, CNC woodworking, conveyor belt, conveyor belt printer, Hackaday Columns, infinite build volume printer, maslow, photospectrometer, plywood, pressure sensitive, pressure sensor, reflectance, reflectance sensor, reprap, scara, solar lantern, spectrometer, The Hackaday Prize, wooden CNC router, woodworking | Leave a comment

Rocket Bullets: The Flame and Fizzle of the Gyrojet

In the 1950’s and 60’s, the world had rocket fever. Humankind was taking its first steps into space and had sights on the moon. Kids could build rockets at the kitchen table and launch them in the schoolyard. On the darker side, the arms race was well underway with the US and USSR trying to close the fictional missile gap.

All around the world, engineers were trying to do new things with rockets. Among these were Robert Mainhardt and Arthur T. Biehl, who thought rockets could be useful as small arms. Together they formed MBA (short for Mainhardt and Biehl …read more

Continue reading

Posted in bullet, classic hacks, Gyrojet, Hackaday Columns, history, Less-Lethal, Original Art, rocket bullets | Leave a comment

Hackaday Links: July 8, 2018

Software-defined radio has been around for years, but it’s only recently that it’s been accessible to those of us who don’t have tens of thousands of dollars worth of equipment in their lab. Here’s a new book from Analog Devices that gives you the lowdown on software-defined radio. It’s heavy on MATLAB and components from Analog, but it’s still a solid foundation for SDR.

Do you like cyberpunk? Do you like stories about rebellious people overthrowing the system? How about androids? Do you like androids? Here’s a Kickstarter that’s tying all of that together. Neptune Frost is (will be?) a …read more

Continue reading

Posted in analog, Asteroid Day, cyberpunk, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links, journal, kickstarter, retropie, sdr, software-defined radio | Leave a comment

Wrangling RC Servos Becoming a Hassle? Try Serial Bus Servos!

When we need actuators for a project, a servo from the remote-control hobby world is a popular solution. Though as the number of servos go up, keeping their wires neat and managing their control signals become a challenge. Once we start running more servos than we have fingers and toes, it’s worth considering the serial bus variety. Today we’ll go over what they are and examine three products on the market.

Our Friend the RC Servo

Remote control hobby servos are remarkable little devices. Each one is a self-contained closed-loop actuator, available across a wide spectrum of price and torque. …read more

Continue reading

Posted in continuous rotation servo, Hackaday Columns, hobby servo, how-to, rc servo, robots hacks, serial, serial control, serial interface, servo control, servo motor | Leave a comment