Category Archives: Hackaday Columns

All the Badges of DEF CON 26 (vol 1)

Two or three years back you would see a handful of really interesting unofficial badges at DEF CON. Now, there’s a deluge of clever, beautiful, and well executed badges. Last weekend I tried to see every badge and meet every badge maker. Normally, I would publish one megapost to show off everything I had seen, but this year I’m splitting it into volumes. Join me after the break for the first upload of the incredible badges of DC26!

Telephreak Eleven Badge

The Telephreak party at DEF CON is a gathering of a tight knit group of phone phreakers who spend …read more

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Posted in add-ons, badges, cons, DEF CON, DEFCON 26, Hackaday Columns, roundup, unofficial | Leave a comment

Behind The Pin: Logic Level Outputs

There is one thing that unites almost every computer and logic circuit commonly used in the hardware hacking and experimentation arena. No matter what its age, speed, or internal configuration, electronics speak to the world through logic level I/O. A single conductor which is switched between voltage levels to denote a logic 1 or logic zero. This is an interface standard that has survived the decades from the earliest integrated circuit logic output of the 1960s to the latest microcontroller GPIO in 2018.

The effect of this tried and true arrangement is that we can take a 7400 series I/O …read more

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Posted in 74 series logic, behind the pin, digital logic, Engineering, Hackaday Columns, logic, Original Art, parts | Leave a comment

Dawn of the First Digital Camera

Technology vanishes. It either succeeds and becomes ubiquitous or fails. For example, there was a time when networking and multimedia were computer buzzwords. Now they are just how computers work. On the other hand, when was the last time you thought about using a CueCat barcode reader to scan an advertisement? Then there are the things that have their time and vanish, like pagers. It is hard to decide which category digital cameras fall into. They are being absorbed into our phones and disappearing as a separate category for most consumers. But have you ever wondered about the first digital …read more

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Posted in digital camera, digital cameras hacks, Hackaday Columns, history, Retrotechtacular | Leave a comment

Hackaday Links: August 12, 2018

Falling into the marvelous space between, ‘I really want to do that’ and ‘but that’s a lot of work and I’m lazy’ comes this reproduction of the motherboard from the original IBM 5150. This is a complete reproduction of the first PC, being sold as a kit. Yes, chips are included, although I highly doubt they’ve gone through the trouble of finding chips with contemporaneous date codes. We’re dying for a writeup on this one.

Someone has found the source code for the first Furby. [Mark Boldyrev] was talking with a few fellows on the MAME forum to see if …read more

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Posted in 6502, bitfi, furby, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links, mcaffee, via c3 | Leave a comment

Car Hacking at DEF CON 26

A great place to get your feet wet with the data-network-wonderland that is modern-day automobiles is the Car Hacking Village at DEF CON. I stopped by on Saturday afternoon to see what it was all about and the place was packed. From Ducati motorcycles to junkyard instrument clusters, and from mobility scooters to autonomous RC test tracks, this feels like one of the most interactive villages in the whole con.

The Obvious: CAN Bus Hacking

When I think of car hacking, CAN bus is the first thing that pops to mind. CAN is the protocol used for the data network …read more

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Posted in autonomous vehicle, car hacking, car hacking village, car hacks, cons, ctf, DEF CON, DEFCON 26, escape room, Hackaday Columns, mobility scooter | Leave a comment

Circuit VR: Starting an Amplifier Design

Sometimes I wish FETs had become practical before bipolar transistors. A FET is a lot more like a tube and amplifies voltages. Bipolar transistors amplify current and that makes them a bit harder to use. Recently, [Jenny List] did a series on transistor amplifiers including the topic of this Circuit VR, the common emitter amplifier. [Jenny] talked about biasing. I’ll start with biasing too, but in the next installment, I want to talk about how to use capacitors in this design and how to blend two amplifiers together and why you’d want to do that.

But before you can dive …read more

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Posted in amplifier, bipolar transistor, circuit vr, common emitter, Hackaday Columns, how-to, LTSpice, Skills, transistor | Leave a comment

Big Power, Little Power, Tiny Power, Zap!

Our Hackaday Prize Challenges are evaluated by a panel of judges who examine every entry to see how they fare against judging criteria. With prize money at stake, it makes sense we want to make sure it is done right. But we also have our Hackaday Prize achievements, with less at stake leading to a more free-wheeling way to recognize projects that catch our eye. Most of the achievements center around fun topics that aren’t related to any particular challenge, but it’s a little different for the Infinite Improbability achievement. This achievement was unlocked by any project that impressed with …read more

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Posted in 2018 Hackaday Prize, Hackaday Columns, peltier, photovoltaic, potato battery, potato cell, solar charger, solar collector, solar energy, solar tracker, sun tracking, TEG, The Hackaday Prize, thermoelectric generator, triboelectric | Leave a comment

Video Quick Bit: Power Harvesting Hacks

Majenta Strongheart is back again, this time taking a look at some of the coolest power harvesting projects in this year’s Hackaday Prize.

The entire idea of the Power Harvesting Challenge is to get usable power from something, be it solar energy, a rushing waterfall, or fueling steam turbines with hamsters. [Cole B] decided that instead of capturing energy from one of these power sources, he’d do it all. He created Power Generation Modules, or Lego bricks for harvesting power. There’s a hand crank module, a water turbine module, and enough modules to do something with all that captured …read more

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Posted in 2018 Hackaday Prize, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday Prize Update, Power Harvesting Challenge, The Hackaday Prize, video quick-bit | Leave a comment

Recorded Programming — Thanks to Bing Crosby

If you look up Bing Crosby in Wikipedia, the first thing you’ll notice is his real name was Harry. The second thing you’ll read, though, is that he is considered the first “multimedia star.” In 1948, half of the recorded music played on the air was by Bing Crosby. He also was a major motion picture star and a top-selling recording artist. However, while you might remember Bing for his songs like White Christmas, or for his orange juice commercials, or for accusations of poor treatment from his children, you probably don’t associate him with the use of magnetic tape. …read more

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Posted in bing crosby, electric transcription, Hackaday Columns, history, magnetic tape, Original Art, tape recorder | Leave a comment

DSO Nano 3 Review: a 20 MHz Pocket ‘Scope For Not A Lot

The oscilloscope is an essential tool of any electronics bench, and it is also an instrument whose capabilities have expanded exponentially over the decades. Your entirely analogue CRT ‘scope of a few decades ago has now been supplanted by a digital device that takes on many of the functions of both an expensive multimeter a frequency counter, and more. At the top end of the market the sky is the limit when it comes to budget, and the lower end stretches down to low-bandwidth devices based upon commodity microcontrollers for near-pocket-money prices.

These super-cheap ‘scopes are usually sold as kits, …read more

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Posted in DSO nano 3, Hackaday Columns, oxcilloscope, pocket oscilloscope, pocket scope, reviews, scope, tool hacks | Leave a comment