Category Archives: i2c

Swapping the ROMs in Mini Arcade Cabinets

You’ve probably seen a few of these miniature arcade games online or in big box retailers: for $20 USD or so you get scaled-down version of a classic arcade cabinet, perfect for a desk toy or to throw up on a shelf as part of your gaming collection. Like any …read more

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Posted in arcade cabinet, bus pirate, classic hacks, flash, Games, hex editor, i2c, reverse engineering, spi | Leave a comment

USB Power Delivery For All The Things

The promise of USB Power Delivery (USB-PD) is that we’ll eventually be able to power all our gadgets, at least the ones that draw less than 100 watts anyway, with just one adapter. Considering most of us are the proud owners of a box filled with assorted AC/DC adapters in …read more

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Posted in i2c, parts, peripherals hacks, power supply, STUSB4500, USB C, USB-PD | Leave a comment

Trill: Easy Positional Touch Sensors for Your Projects

Creating capacitive touch-sensitive buttons is easy these days; many microcontrollers have cap-sense hardware built-in. This will work for simple on/off control, but what if you want a linear, position-sensitive input, like you’d find on a computer touchpad or your smartphone screen? Not so easy — at least until now. Trill …read more

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Posted in Bela, capacitive sensing, capacitive sensor, capacitive slider, capsense, Crowd Funding, CY8C20636A, cypress, Hackaday Columns, i2c, kickstarter, Microcontrollers, news, slider, Trill | Leave a comment

PackProbe Reports Laptop Battery Health

The 18650 cell has become a ubiquitous standard in the lithium battery world. From power drills to early Tesla vehicles, these compact cells power all manner of portable devices. A particularly common use is in laptop batteries, where they’re often built into a pack using the Smart Battery System. This …read more

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Posted in batteries, battery, classic hacks, i2c, laptop batteries, laptop battery, smart battery system, SMBus | Leave a comment

DIY Button Matrix Lights Up And Speaks I2C

[David Johnson-Davies] always wanted an illuminated button matrix for projects, but cost was never very friendly. That all changed when he discovered a cheap source of illuminated pushbuttons on Aliexpress, leading to this DIY 4×4 illuminated button matrix design which communicates over I2C. The button states can be …read more

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Posted in attiny, ATtiny Hacks, attiny88, button matrix, i2c, illuminated buttons, led hacks, led matrix, Microcontrollers | Leave a comment

Teardown: AppLights Personalized Projection

Listen, it hurts to hear, but somebody needs to say it. It’s over, OK? You’ve got to admit it and move on. Sure, you could get away with it for a week or two in January, but now it’s just getting weird. No matter how hard you fight it, the …read more

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Posted in bluetooth, christmas lights, Holiday Hacks, home depot, i2c, led, led hacks, logic analyzer, projector, rgb, teardown, TTC2541 | Leave a comment

Modernizing a Soviet-era LED Matrix

Used in everything from calculators to military hardware, the 3LS363A is an interesting piece of vintage hardware. With a resolution of 5 x 7 (plus a decimal point), the Soviet-made displays contain no electronics and are simply an array of 36 green LEDs. It’s not hard to drive one of them in a pinch, but [Dmitry Grinberg] thought this classic device deserved a bit better than the minimum.

He’s developed a small board that sits behind the 3LS363A and allows you to control it over I2C for a much more modern experience when working with these vintage displays. Powered by …read more

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Posted in 3LS363A, ATtiny Hacks, ATtiny406, display, i2c, led, led hacks, parts, soviet | Leave a comment

Arduino and Pi Share Boardspace

A Raspberry Pi Zero (W) and Arduino are very different animals, the prior has processing power and connectivity while the latter has some analog to digital converters (ADCs) and nearly real-time reactions. You can connect them to one another with a USB cable and for many projects that will happily wed the two. Beyond that, we can interface this odd couple entirely through serial, SPI, I2C, and logic-level signaling. How? Through a device by [cburgess] that is being called an Arduino shield that supports a Pi0 (W). Maybe it is a cape which interfaces with Arduino. The distinction may be …read more

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Posted in 328p Atmega, arduino, Arduino Hacks, Due, i2c, Logic-level signaling, mega, Raspberry Pi, serial, spi, uno | Leave a comment

From SPIDriver to I2CDriver

Communicating with microcontrollers and other embedded systems requires a communications standard. SPI is a great one, and is commonly used, but it’s not the only one available. There’s also I2C which has some advantages and disadvantages compared to SPI. The problem with both standards, however, is that modern computers don’t come with either built-in. To solve that problem and allow easier access to debugging in SPI, [James Bowman] built the SPIDriver a few months ago, and is now back by popular demand with a similar device for I2C, the I2CDriver.

Much like the SPIDriver, the I2C driver is a debugging …read more

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Posted in communications, i2c, i2cdriver, microcontroller, Microcontrollers, screen, spi, tool, usb | Leave a comment

Arduino Gets a Command Line Interface

When using an Arduino, at least once you’ve made it past blinking LEDs, you might start making use of the serial connection to send and receive information from the microcontroller. Communicating with the board while it’s interacting with its environment is a crucial way to get information in real-time. Usually, that’s as far as it goes, but [Pieter] wanted to take it a step farther than that with his command line interpreter (CLI) for the Arduino.

The CLI allows the user to run Unix-like commands directly on the Arduino. This means control of GPIO and the rest of the features …read more

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Posted in arduino, cli, command line, gpio, i2c, Microcontrollers, serial, shell, unix, uno | Leave a comment