Category Archives: LoRaWAN

LoRa Tutorials For The DIY Masses

LoRa is the go-to tech for low power, long range wireless sensor networks. Designing with off-the-shelf modules can be a boon or a bane depending on the documentation and support. Luckily, [Renzo] has prepared a set of tutorials to get you started.
In his seven part series of write-ups, [Renzo]

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Posted in arduino, home hacks, LoRa, LoRaWAN, misc hacks, Wemos d1, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

AAA Powered LoRa Mailbox Sensor Goes the Distance

As more of the world’s communication moves into the electronic realm, a casualty has come in the physical mail. Where once each new day might have brought with it a bulging mailbox, today it’s not uncommon for days to pass with not even so much as a bill or a …read more

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Posted in LoRa, LoRaWAN, mailbox, notification, radio hacks, The Things Network | Leave a comment

Hackaday Links: February 2, 2020

Is it just me or did January seem to last for about three months this year? A lot has happened since the turn of the decade 31 days ago, both in the normie world and in our space. But one of the biggest pieces of news in the hacker community …read more

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Posted in 2020 Hackaday Belgrade, con, ct, digital detox, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links, larynx, LoRaWAN, mummy, security, serbia, surplus, voice | Leave a comment

Winners of the Take Flight with Feather Contest

It’s hard to beat the fidelity and durability of printed text on paper. But the e-paper display gets pretty close, and if you couple it will great design and dependable features, you might just prefer an e-reader over a bookshelf full of paperbacks. What if the deal is sweetened by …read more

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Posted in adafruit, Adafruit Feather, contests, e-ink, e-paper, ereader, gesture control, Hackaday Contests, LoRaWAN, Open Book Project, spider bot | Leave a comment

Which Wireless is Right Wireless?

Back in the early days of Arduino proliferation (and before you ask, yes we realize there was a time before that too), wireless was a strange and foreign beast. IR communication was definitely a thing. And if you had the funds there was this cool technology called ZigBee that was available, often in funny blue house-shaped XBee boards. With even more funds and a stomach for AT commands you could even bolt on a 2G cell radio for unlimited range. WiFi existed too, but connecting it to a hobbyist ecosystem of boards was a little hairier (though maybe not for …read more

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Posted in ble, bluetooth, bluetooth LE, LoRaWAN, NB-IoT, NFC, reference, sigfox, wifi, wireless hacks, z-wave, zigbee | Leave a comment

Hackaday Belgrade: Luka Mustafa on Exploiting IoT Niches

Ecology is a strange discipline. At its most basic, it’s the study of how living things interact with their environment. It doesn’t so much seek to explain how life works, but rather how lives work together. A guiding principle of ecology is that life finds a way to exploit niches, subregions within the larger world with a particular mix of resources and challenges. It’s actually all quite fascinating.

But what does ecology have to do with Luka Mustafa’s talk at the 2018 Hackaday Belgrade Conference? Everything, as it turns out, and not just because Luka and his colleagues put IoT …read more

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Posted in cons, conservation, ecology, ecosystems, gateway, green hacks, Hackaday Belgrade 2018, Hackaday Columns, image analysis, IoT, iridium, LoRaWAN, mapping, PiCam, Raspberry Pi, sensors | Leave a comment

The Solid State Weather Station

Building personal weather stations has become easier now than ever before, thanks to all the improvements in sensors, electronics, and prototyping techniques. The availability of cheap networking modules allows us to make sure these IoT devices can transmit their information to public databases, thereby providing local communities with relevant weather data about their immediate surroundings.

[Manolis Nikiforakis] is attempting to build the Weather Pyramid — a completely solid-state, maintenance free, energy and communications autonomous weather sensing device, designed for mass scale deployment. Typically, a weather station has sensors for measuring temperature, pressure, humidity, wind speed and rainfall. While most of …read more

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Posted in inertial, LoRa, LoRaWAN, mpu-9150, mpu6050, Rain sensor, The Hackaday Prize, weather, wind sensor | Leave a comment