Category Archives: magnets

Magnets Turn Flexible PCB Into Electric Grasshopper

Just because something doesn’t seem to have an apparent purpose, that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t try making it anyway. As flexible PCBs become cheaper and easier to order from low-scale fab houses, we’re seeing hobbyists experiment with new uses for them such as [Carl Bugeja]’s jumping circuit.

The circuit is …read more

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Posted in electromagnet, flexible circuit board, flexible PCB, flexible robotics, hardware, magnets | Leave a comment

Magnets Make Prototyping E-Textiles a Snap

How do you prototype e-textiles? Any way you can that doesn’t drive you insane or waste precious conductive thread. We can’t imagine an easier way to breadboard wearables than this appropriately-named ThreadBoard.

If you’ve never played around with e-textiles, they can be quite fiddly to prototype. Of course, copper wires …read more

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Posted in conductive thread, f'n magnets, how-to, magnets, prototyping, rapid prototyping, wearable hacks, Wearables | Leave a comment

Sequence Your Beats With The Magic Of Magnets

Typically, when we think of a music sequencer, we envisage LEDs and boards covered in buttons. Of course, there are naturally other ways to build such a device. MesoTune takes a different tack entirely, relying on magnets and rotating mechanisms to get the job done.

MesoTune acts as a MIDI …read more

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Posted in magnet, magnets, midi controller, midi sequencer, musical hacks, sequencer | Leave a comment

Magnets Versus Laundry Detergent

Soap cleans clothes better than magnets. There, we are spoiling the ending so don’t accuse us of clickbaiting. The funny thing is that folks believe this is plausible enough to ask magnets experts so often that they dedicate a blog entry to comparing magnets and soap. Since you already know …read more

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Posted in citizen science, clean, detergent, home hacks, laundry, magnets, scientific method | Leave a comment

Hiding Messages In Magnets

Magnets have always been fun, particularly since the super-powerful neodymium type became readily available. You can stack them up, pull them apart, or, if you really want, use them for something practical. Now [Adric] has shown us a new use for them entirely – by writing hidden messages on them. …read more

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Posted in Hidden text, magnet, magnets, misc hacks | Leave a comment

Can Magnets Replace The Spring In A Pogo Stick?

Betteridge’s law of headlines states that any headline that ends in a question mark can be answered by the word ‘no’. It’s the case with articles asking if Millennials are responsible for all of the world’s ills, or if some technology is the future. So we come to this fascinating case of native content (amusing, veiled advertising) from a store that sells really, really powerful magnets. The title of the article asks if magnets can replace the spring in a pogo stick. The answer, of course, is no, but it does provide a fascinating look at linear versus exponential growth. …read more

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Posted in Hooke's law, how do they work, magnets, misc hacks, pogo stick, science, spring | Leave a comment

An Integrated Electromagnetic Lifting Module for Robots

The usual way a robot moves an object is by grabbing it with a gripper or using suction, but [Mile] believes that electromagnets offer a lot of advantages that are worth exploring, and has designed the ELM (Electromagnetic Lifting Module) in order to make experimenting with electromagnetic effectors more accessible. The ELM is much more than just a breakout board for an electromagnet; [Mile] has put a lot of work into making a module that is easy to interface with and use. ELM integrates a proximity sensor, power management, and LED lighting as well as 3D models for vertical or …read more

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Posted in effector, electromagnet, magnet, magnetic lifting, magnets, robotic, robots hacks, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

Beverage Holder of Science

The folks at [K&J Magnetics] have access to precise magnetometers, a wealth of knowledge from years of experience but when it comes to playing around with a silly project like a magnetic koozie, they go right to trial and error rather than simulations and calculations. Granted, this is the opposite of mission-critical.

Once the experimentation was over, they got down to explaining their results so we can learn more than just how to hold our beer on the side of a toolbox. They describe three factors related to magnetic holding in clear terms that are the meat and bones of …read more

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Posted in beer, Beer Hacks, beverage, cola, cozy, how-to, koozie, magnets, neodymium, soda | Leave a comment

Hovering Questions About Magnetic Levitation

Who doesn’t love magnets? They’re functional, mysterious, and at the heart of nearly every electric motor. They can make objects appear to defy gravity or move on their own. If you’re like us, when you first started grappling with the refrigerator magnets, you tried to make one hover motionlessly over another. We tried to position one magnet over another by pitting their repellent forces against each other but [K&J Magnetics] explains why this will never work and how levitation can be done with electromagnets. (YouTube, embedded below.)

In the video, there is a quick demonstration of their levitation rig and …read more

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Posted in hover, levitation, magnetics, magnets, permanent magnet, suspension, toy hacks | Leave a comment

Cheap and Easy Magnetic DNA Separation Method Needs Your Help

When you consider that almost every single cell in your body has more than a meter of DNA coiled up inside its nucleus, it seems like it should be pretty easy to get some to study. But with all the other cellular gunk in a crude preparation, DNA can be quite hard to isolate. That’s where this cheap and easy magnetic DNA separation method comes in. If it can be optimized and tested with some help from the citizen science community.

Commercial DNA separation methods generally involve mixing silica beads into crude cell fractions; the DNA preferentially binds to the …read more

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Posted in magnetite, magnets, silca, waterglass | Leave a comment