Category Archives: mechanical engineering

How To Reverse Engineer Mechanical Designs for 3D Modeling

If you’re interested in 3D printing or CNC milling — or really any kind of fabrication — then duplicating or interfacing with an existing part is probably on your to-do list. The ability to print replacement parts when something breaks is often one of the top selling points of 3D printing. Want some proof? Just take a look at what people made for our Repairs You Can Print contest.

Of course, to do that you need to be able to make an accurate 3D model of the replacement part. That’s fairly straightforward if the part has simple geometry made up …read more

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Posted in how-to, measuring, mechanical engineering, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

Amazing Mechanical Linkages and The Software to Design Them

Most of us are more bits-and-bytes than nuts-and-bolts, but we have the deepest appreciation for the combination of the two. So, apparently, does [rectorsquid]. Check out the design and flow of his rolling ball sculpture (YouTube, embedded below) to see what we mean. See how the arms hesitate just a bit as the ball is transferred? See how the upper arm gently places it on the ramp with a slight downward gesture? See how it’s done with one motor? There’s no way [rectorsquid] designed this on paper, right?

Of course he didn’t (YouTube). Instead, he wrote a simulator that …read more

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Posted in linkage, mechanical engineering, sculpture, simulation, software hacks, toy hacks | Leave a comment

Marvelous Mechanisms: The Ubiquitous Four Bar Linkage

The four bar linkage is a type of mechanical linkage that is used in many different devices. A few examples are: locking pliers, bicycles, oil well pumps, loaders, internal combustion engines, compressors, and pantographs. In biology we can also find examples of this linkage, as in the human knee joint, where the mechanism allows rotation and keeps the two legs bones attached to each other. It is also present in some fish jaws that evolved to take advantage of the force multiplication that the four bar mechanism can provide.

How It Works

The study of linkages started with Archimedes who …read more

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Posted in linkage, machine, mechanical engineering, mechanism | Leave a comment