Category Archives: NodeMCU

Fried Desk Lamp Reborn: How to Use ESP8266 to Build Connected Devices

Some hacks are born of genius or necessity, and others from our sheer ham-fisted incompetence. This is not a story about the first kind. But it did give me an excuse to show how easy it is to design WiFi-connected devices that work the way you want them to, rather …read more

Continue reading

Posted in desk lamp, ESP8266, Featured, home hacks, how-to, NodeMCU, repair hacks, Skills, udp, xiaomi, yeelight | Leave a comment

ESP8266 Sound Machine Soothes Baby Remotely

[Zack] had trouble getting his six-month-old to sleep through the night. That was before he found out about ‘shh’ videos on YouTube. These are exactly what they sound like: eight hours of someone whooshing white noise into a microphone. He set a phone up on a charger in the nursery …read more

Continue reading

Posted in baby, ESP8266, lifehacks, NodeMCU, shh video | Leave a comment

Desktop Weather Monitor Leaves Nothing to Chance

[Mirko Pavleski] has put together a little weather station for himself that combines Internet-sourced forecasts with physical sensor data to give him a complete view of his local conditions. There’s no shortage of weather applications for our smartphones and computers that will show us the current local conditions and the …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Arduino Hacks, BMP180, Microcontrollers, NodeMCU, Nokia 5110 LCD, oled, weather forecast, weather monitor | Leave a comment

Transcending the Stack with the Right Network Protocol

The increase in network-connected devices the past years has been something of a dual-edged sword. While on one hand it’s really nice to have an easy and straight-forward method to have devices talk with each other, this also comes with a whole host of complications, mostly related to reliability and …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Hackaday Columns, home automation, home hacks, mqtt, Network Hacks, NodeMCU, security, tls, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

Building A Simple Python API for Internet of Things Gadgets

It’s no secret that I rather enjoy connecting things to the Internet for fun and profit. One of the tricks I’ve learned along the way is to spin up simple APIs that can be used when prototyping a project. It’s easy to do, and simple to understand so I’m happy …read more

Continue reading

Posted in api, datalogger, Hackaday Columns, how-to, https, IoT, NodeMCU, Original Art, python 3.0, Skills, Tech Hacks | Leave a comment

Compiling NodeMCU for the ESP32 With Support for Public-Private Key Encryption

When I began programming microcontrollers in 2003, I had picked up the Atmel STK-500 and learned assembler for their ATtiny and ATmega lines. At the time I thought it was great – the emulator and development boards were good, and I could add a microcontroller permanently to a project for a dollar. Then the ESP8266 came out.

I was pretty blown away by its features, switched platforms, except for timing-sensitive applications, and it’s been my chip of choice for a few years. A short while ago, a friend gave me an ESP32, the much faster, dual core version of the …read more

Continue reading

Posted in compile, cryptography, ESP32, hardware, how-to, lua, Microcontrollers, NodeMCU, parts, proof of work | Leave a comment

Reflex Trainer Puts Athletes To The Test

Being a top athlete in this modern age is a full-time job. No longer do athletes simply practice at their nominated sport of choice. They undergo strength training, full nutritional programs, cardio, and even reflex training.

Reflex training involves a series of nodes that an athlete must identify when lit up, and touch them to switch them off. By triggering them in a fast sequence, the athlete must work hard to both identify the lit node and then move to switch it off. TrainerLights is just such a system, built around the NodeMCU platform.

The system consists of a minimum …read more

Continue reading

Posted in classic hacks, excercise, exercise, led, NodeMCU, reflex trainer, reflex training | Leave a comment

Weather Station Is A Tutorial in Low Power Design

Building your own weather station is a fun project in itself, but building it to be self-sufficient and off-grid adds another set of challenges to the mix. You’ll need a battery and a solar panel to power the station, which means adding at least a regulator and charge controller to your build. If the panel and battery are small, you’ll also need to make some power-saving tweaks to the code as well. (Google Translate from Italian) The tricks that [Danilo Larizza] uses in his build are useful for more than just weather stations though, they’ll be perfect for anyone trying …read more

Continue reading

Posted in arduino, battery, code, Microcontrollers, NodeMCU, optimization, panel, power, solar, Station, weather | Leave a comment

Voice Controlled Stereo Balance With ESP8266

A stereo setup assumes that the listener is physically located between the speakers, that’s how it can deliver sound equally from both sides. It’s also why the receiver has a “Balance” adjustment, so the listener can virtually move the center point of the audio by changing the relative volume of the speakers. You should set your speaker balance so that your normal sitting location is centered, but of course you might not always be in that same position every time you listen to music or watch something.

[Vije Miller] writes in with his unique solution to the problem of the …read more

Continue reading

Posted in digital audio hacks, home entertainment hacks, Microcontrollers, NodeMCU, stereo, voice control, VoiceAttack, X9C104P | Leave a comment

The Solution To Oversized Dev Boards: A Literal Hack

Oh, there was a time when you could prototype just about everything on a breadboard. The CPU in your computer came in a DIP package, and there were no BGA packages. to be found anywhere. In the forty years since then, chips have gotten smaller, packages have gotten more cramped, and you can barely hand-solder the coolest chips anymore. No worries — companies are still spitting out dev boards with 0.1″ headers, but there’s a problem: they don’t fit on a solderless breadboard. They’re too wide. Our world is falling apart.

[Luc] had a problem when he was playing with …read more

Continue reading

Posted in breadboard, hardware, NodeMCU, solderless breadboard | Leave a comment