Category Archives: Raspberry Pi Zero W

Ask Hackaday: How Would You Build This Flight Tracker for Kids?

You’ve got to hand it to marketers – they really know how to make you want something. All it takes is a little parental guilt, a bit of technical magic, and bam, you’re locked into a product you never knew you needed.

This prototype flight tracking nightlight for kids is …read more

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Posted in api, Ask Hackaday, DLP2000EVM, flight tracker, projector, Raspberry Pi Zero W | Leave a comment

Curbing Internet Addiction In A Threatening Manner

Those who have children of their own might argue that the youth of today are getting far too much internet time. [Nick] decided to put an emergency stop to it and made this ingenious internet kill switch to threaten teenagers with. Rather unassuming on the outside, the big red button …read more

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Posted in big red buttons, firewall, home networking, kill switch, network, Network Hacks, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero W, wireless charging | Leave a comment

Old Nixie Display Rides Again As 3D-Printer Filament Meter

We’re not sure about the name of this Nixie tube filament meter that [Scott M. Baker] built. He calls it a “filadometer”, perhaps a portmanteau of “filament” and “odometer”, in which case it makes sense. It may not flow trippingly from the tongue and we can’t come up with anything …read more

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Posted in 3d Printer hacks, 74141, filament meter, gauge, high voltage, nixie, Octoprint, prusa, Raspberry Pi Zero W, shift register | Leave a comment

A Vintage Sony Portable TV, Brought Up To Date

In the time before smartphones for on-the-go visual entertainment, there were portable TVs. You might think of a portable TV as a luggable device, but the really cool ones were pocket-sized. Perhaps if you are familiar with pocket TVs you’ll be thinking of a Citizen or a Casio with a …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, Raspberry Pi Zero W, Sony Watchman, videophone | Leave a comment

This Bitcoin Price Tracking Traffic Light Isn’t Just A Red LED

Quick, what’s the price of Bitcoin? Is it lower today than yesterday? Are you overdrafting your Lamborghini account? What if you had an easy way to tell at a glance how much you could have made if you sold in December of last year? That’s what this Bitcoin price tracking traffic light is all about, and it’s a great use of existing electronics.

The hardware for this build is a traffic light table lamp available on Amazon for twenty bucks. Inside this traffic light, you get a PCB with three LEDs and a small microcontroller to control the LEDs. The …read more

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Posted in bitcoin, Bitcoin price tracker, docker, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero W | Leave a comment

CalClock Keeps You Tied To The Mast

Now that most of what we do revolves around our phones and/or the internet, it’s nearly impossible to take a short break from work to check the ol’ calendar without being lured by the sirens on the shore of social media. Well, [samvanhook] was tired of being drawn in when all he really needs is a vague idea of what’s coming up for him in the next 12 hours. Enter the CalClock.

Thanks to color-coded segments, [sam] can tell at a glance if he has something coming up soon in Google Calendar, or if he can dive back into work. …read more

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Posted in Neopixels, plywood, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero W | Leave a comment

Portable DVD Player gets Raspberry Pi Zero Upgrade

You might remember a time when people thought portable DVD players were a pretty neat idea. In the days before netbooks, cheap tablets, and arguably even the widespread adoption of smartphones, it seemed perfectly reasonable to lug around a device that did nothing but play movies. Today we look back at them as we would flip phones: a quaint precursor to the technology overload we find ourselves in currently. But the fact remains that millions of these comical little devices were pumped into the greedy maw of the consumer electronics market. They’re ripe for the hacking, all you need is …read more

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Posted in mcp3008, portable DVD player, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero W | Leave a comment

Google’s AIY Vision Kit Augments Pi With Vision Processor

Google has announced their soon to be available Vision Kit, their next easy to assemble Artificial Intelligence Yourself (AIY) product. You’ll have to provide your own Raspberry Pi Zero W but that’s okay since what makes this special is Google’s VisionBonnet board that they do provide, basically a low power neural network accelerator board running TensorFlow.

The VisionBonnet is built around the Intel® Movidius™ Myriad 2 (aka MA2450) vision processing unit (VPU) chip. See the video below for an overview of this chip, but what it allows is the rapid processing of compute-intensive neural networks. We don’t think you’d use …read more

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Posted in neural network, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero W, tensorflow | Leave a comment

Hackaday Prize Entry: Rangefinder + Camera = SmartZoom

The interesting thing about submissions for The Hackaday Prize is seeing unusual projects and concepts that might not otherwise pop up. [ken conrad] has a curious but thoughtfully designed idea for Raspberry Pi-based SmartZoom Imaging that uses a Pi Zero and camera plus some laser emitters to create a device with a very specific capability: a camera that constantly and dynamically resizes the image make the subject appear consistently framed and sized, regardless of its distance from the lens. The idea brings together two separate functions: rangefinding and automated zooming and re-sampling of the camera image.

The Raspberry Pi uses …read more

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Posted in laser, rangefinder, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry pi camera, Raspberry Pi Zero W, The Hackaday Prize | Leave a comment

The Raspberry Pi As An IR To WiFi Bridge

[Jason] has a Sonos home sound system, with a bunch of speakers connected via WiFi. [Jason] also has a universal remote designed and manufactured in a universe where WiFi doesn’t exist. The Sonos can not be controlled via infrared. There’s an obvious problem here, but luckily tiny Linux computers with WiFi cost $10, and IR receivers cost $2. The result is an IR to WiFi bridge to control all those ‘smart’ home audio solutions.

The only thing [Jason] needed to control his Sonos from a universal remote is an IR receiver and a Raspberry Pi Zero W. The circuit is …read more

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Posted in home entertainment hacks, ir, lirc, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Zero W, sonos | Leave a comment