Category Archives: Raspberry Pi

Auto Added by WPeMatico

Hackaday Links: March 17, 2019

There’s now an official Raspberry Pi keyboard and mouse. The mouse is a mouse clad in pink and white plastic, but the Pi keyboard has some stuff going for it. It’s small, which is what you want for a Pi keyboard, and it has a built-in USB hub. Even Apple …read more

Continue reading

Posted in ai, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links, NeXT, Power Wheels, Raspberry Pi, RCL | Leave a comment

RetroPie NES Clock Tells You When it’s Game Time

We’ve all seen the 3D printed replicas of classic game consoles which house a Raspberry Pi; in fact, there’s a pretty good chance some of the people reading this post have one of their own. They’re a great way to add some classic gaming emulation to your entertainment center, especially …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 3D printed enclosure, clock, led matrix, nes, nintendo hacks, Raspberry Pi, RetroPi | Leave a comment

Fueled By Jealousy, This Smart Lamp Really Shines

As a lover of lava lamps, [Julian Butler] knew when he saw a coworker’s modern LED incarnation of the classic piece of illuminated decor that he had to have one for himself. The only problem was that the Kickstarter for it had long since ended, and they were no longer …read more

Continue reading

Posted in diffuser, fadecandy, lamp, lava lamp, led hacks, neopixel, Raspberry Pi, RGB LED | Leave a comment

Leigh Johnson’s Guide To Machine Vision On Raspberry Pi

We salute hackers who make technology useful for people in emerging markets. Leigh Johnson joined that select group when she accepted the challenge to build portable machine vision units that work offline and can be deployed for under $100 each. For hardware, a Raspberry Pi with camera plus screen can …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2018 Hackaday Superconference, cons, convolutional neural network, deep learning, dice, dogs, Hackaday Columns, keras, machine learning, machine vision, Raspberry Pi, tensorflow | Leave a comment

Hack My House: Garage Door Cryptography Meets Raspberry Pi

Today’s story is one of victory and defeat, of mystery and adventure… It’s time to automate the garage door. Connecting the garage door to the internet was a must on my list of smart home features. Our opener has internet connection capabilities built-in. As you might guess, I’m very skeptical of connecting a device to the internet when I have no control over the software running on it.

The garage door is controlled by a button hung on the garage wall. There is only a pair of wires, so a simple relay should be all that is needed to simulate …read more

Continue reading

Posted in garage door, Hackaday Columns, home automation, home hacks, Raspberry Pi, relay, RESTful, Skills | Leave a comment

Get Organized With This Raspberry Pi E-Ink Calendar

Like many hackers, we love e-ink. There’s something mesmerizing and decidedly futuristic about the way the images shift around and reconstitute themselves. Like something from Harry Potter, but that you can buy on Alibaba instead of from a shop in Diagon Alley. But as anyone who’s used the technology can tell you, the low refresh rate of an e-ink screen limits its potential applications. It works great for reading books, but beyond that its struggled to find its niche in a world of cheap LCDs.

But [Zonglin Li] has recently wrapped up a project which shows that e-ink has …read more

Continue reading

Posted in calendar, e-ink, parts, python 3, Raspberry Pi, waveshare | Leave a comment

Cheap Power Over Ethernet For The ESP32

While most projects we see with the ESP32 make use of its considerable wireless capabilities, the chip can be connected to the wired network easily enough should you have the desire to do so. [Steve] liked the idea of putting his ESP32s on the wired network, but found the need for a secondary power connection burdensome. So he took it upon himself to modify some cheap Power Over Ethernet (PoE) hardware and create a single-cable solution (Google Translate).

[Steve] bought a PoE module intended for security cameras and ran a close eye over the board to figure out what kind …read more

Continue reading

Posted in ESP32, MP2494, Network Hacks, networking, PoE, power over ethernet, Raspberry Pi, step-down | Leave a comment

Open Source Biological Gear For the Masses

At the risk of putting too fine a point on it, Hackaday exists because people are out there building and documenting open source gadgets. If the person who built a particular gizmo is willing to show the world how they did it, consider us interested. Since you’re reading this, we’ll assume you are as well. Over the years, this mentality has been spreading out from the relatively niche hacker community into the greater engineering world, and we couldn’t be happier.

Case in point, the Poseidon project created at the California Institute of Technology. Developed by students [Sina Booeshaghi], [Eduardo Beltrame], …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Arduino Hacks, biology, chemistry hacks, microfluidics, microscope, Raspberry Pi, science, syringe pump | Leave a comment

AI on Raspberry Pi with the Intel Neural Compute Stick

I’ve always been fascinated by AI and machine learning. Google TensorFlow offers tutorials and has been on my ‘to-learn’ list since it was first released, although I always seem to neglect it in favor of the shiniest new embedded platform.

Last July, I took note when Intel released the Neural Compute Stick. It looked like an oversized USB stick, and acted as an accelerator for local AI applications, especially machine vision. I thought it was a pretty neat idea: it allowed me to test out AI applications on embedded systems at a power cost of about 1W. It requires pre-trained …read more

Continue reading

Posted in ai, arm, artificial intellegence, facial recognition, Featured, how-to, intel neural compute stick, machine learning, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi 3 B+, Skills | Leave a comment

Raspberry Pi’s Latest Upgrade: the Compute Module 3+

We’ve become so used to the Raspberry Pi line of boards that have appeared in ever-increasing power capabilities since that leap-year morning in 2012 when the inexpensive and now ubiquitous single board computer was announced and oversold its initial production run. The consumer boards have amply fulfilled their mission in providing kids with a pocket-money computer, and even though they are not the most powerful in the class of small Linux boards they remain the one to beat.

The other side of the Pi coin comes with the industrial siblings of the familiar boards, the Compute Module. This is a …read more

Continue reading

Posted in compute module, news, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi Compute Module | Leave a comment