Category Archives: reverse engineering

The Amazon Dash Button: A Retrospective

The Internet of Things will revolutionize everything! Manufacturing? Dog walking? Coffee bean refilling? Car driving? Food eating? Put a sensor in it! The marketing makes it pretty clear that there’s no part of our lives which isn’t enhanced with The Internet of Things. Why? Because with a simple sensor and …read more

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Posted in acoustic modem, amazon, amazon dash button, amazon dash hack, amazon dash wand, Amazon Echo, battery, bluetooth, Dash button, e-waste, Hackaday Columns, hardware, Microcontrollers, reverse engineering, teardown, wifi | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering WyzeSense Hardware

Wyze are a company that produces a variety of home automation products. Their Wyze Sense package is a system of contact and PIR home security sensors, that piggy backs off their Wyze Cam product. In the interests of being able to use this hardware outside the prescribed corporate ecosystem, [Xuan …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, home automation, IoT, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

Hail To The King, Baby: Reverse Engineering Duke

If you’re a fan of DOS games from the 1990s, you’ve almost certainly used DOSBox to replay them on a modern computer. It allows you to run software in a virtual environment that replicates an era-appropriate computer. That’s great for historical accuracy, but doesn’t do you much good if you’re …read more

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Posted in disassembly, dos, dosbox, Games, ida pro, retro gaming, reverse engineering, Software Development | Leave a comment

Your Table Is Ready, Courtesy Of HackRF

Have you ever found yourself in a crowded restaurant on a Saturday night, holding onto one of those little gadgets that blinks and vibrates when it’s your turn to be seated? Next time, bust out the HackRF and follow along with [Tony Tiger] as he shows how it can be …read more

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Posted in gnu radio, HackRF, inspectrum, pager, radio hacks, reverse engineering, Universal Radio Hacker, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

Solving The Final Part Of The iClicker Puzzle

The regular Hackaday reader might remember the iClicker from our previous coverage of the classroom quiz device, or perhaps you even had some first hand experience with it during your university days. A number of hackers have worked to reverse engineer the devices over the years, and on the whole, …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, classroom, disassembler, firmware, i>clicker, reverse engineering, wireless hacks | Leave a comment

Analog Failures on RF Product Cause Production Surprise

A factory is a machine. It takes a fixed set of inputs – circuit boards, plastic enclosures, optimism – and produces a fixed set of outputs in the form of assembled products. Sometimes it is comprised of real machines (see any recent video of a Tesla assembly line) but more …read more

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Posted in bootloader, factory, fet, glitching, hackrf one, hardware, manufacturing, manufacturing problem, operator, pcb, pcba, reverse engineering, rom | Leave a comment

This Owner Took Control Of Their Proprietary Alarm System

When a tip comes in and the tipster feels they have to reassure us that despite appearances their subject is not facilitating crime, it certainly gets our attention. [Flam2006] has a Brinks home security system which can only be configured using a special device only available to installers, and though …read more

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Posted in Brinks, home hacks, home security, reverse engineering, security | Leave a comment

Imitating Art in Life with a Reverse-Engineered Tattoo

In general, tattoo artists are not electrical engineers. That’s fine; the world needs both professions. But when you need a circuit designed, you’re better off turning to an EE rather than a tattoo artist. And you certainly don’t want an EE doing your new ink. Disaster lies that way.

Surprisingly, …read more

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Posted in attiny85, misc hacks, morse, pcb, prime numbers, reverse engineering, smd, tattoo | Leave a comment

Putting an Out of Work iPod Display to Good Use

[Mike Harrison] produces so much quality content that sometimes excellent material slips through the editorial cracks. This time we noticed that one such lost gem was [Mike]’s reverse engineering of the 6th generation iPod Nano display from 2013, as caught when the also prolific [Greg Davill] used one on a recent board. Despite the march of progress in mobile device displays, small screens which are easy to connect to hobbyist style devices are still typically fairly low quality. It’s easy to find fancier displays as salvage but interfacing with them electrically can be brutal, never mind the reverse engineering required …read more

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Posted in display, dsi, fpga, hardware, ipod, ipod hacks, ipod nano, mipi, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

Pokemon Cries And How They Work

If you grew up watching the Pokémon TV series, you’d naturally be familiar with the cries of all your favourite Pocket Monsters. Most of the creatures in the anime tend to say their own name, over and over again. Pour one out for the legions of parents who, upon hearing a distant “PIKA PIKA!”,  still involuntarily twitch to this day.

However, the games differ heavily in this area. Generation I of Pokémon was released on the Game Boy, which simply didn’t have the sound capabilities to deliver full bitstream audio. Instead, sounds were synthesized for the various Pokémon based on …read more

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Posted in nintendo, nintendo hacks, pokemon, reverse engineering | Leave a comment