Category Archives: reverse engineering

Reverse Engineering the TEC-06 Battery Tester

[Syonyk] read that you could solder a few wires to a TEC-06 battery capacity tester, connect it to a TTL serial adapter, and it would interface with some Windows software via a serial port. You can buy it already enabled for serial, but since he had the non-connected version, he was interested in trying it. Not only did it work, but he took the time to reverse engineer the protocol and made a detailed write up about his findings and how he attacked the problem.

Around here, we never need an excuse to reverse engineer anything. But [Synonyk] mentions that …read more

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Posted in Microcontrollers, reverse engineering, serial protocol, TEC-06 | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering the TEC-06 Battery Tester

[Syonyk] read that you could solder a few wires to a TEC-06 battery capacity tester, connect it to a TTL serial adapter, and it would interface with some Windows software via a serial port. You can buy it already enabled for serial, but since he had the non-connected version, he was interested in trying it. Not only did it work, but he took the time to reverse engineer the protocol and made a detailed write up about his findings and how he attacked the problem.

Around here, we never need an excuse to reverse engineer anything. But [Synonyk] mentions that …read more

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Posted in Microcontrollers, reverse engineering, serial protocol, TEC-06 | Leave a comment

How To Reverse Engineer Silicon

A few semesters back, [Jordan] was in an Intro to Hardware Security course at CMU. The final project was open ended, and where some students chose projects like implementing a crypto algorithm or designing something on an FPGA, [Jordan] decided to do something a little more ambitious. He wanted to decapsulate and reverse engineer an IC. No, this isn’t taking a peek at billions of transistors — [Jordan] chose a 74-series Quad XOR for this project — but it does show what goes into reverse engineering silicon, and how even simple chips can be maddeningly confusing.

The first step to …read more

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Posted in hardware, reverse engineering, silicon, XNOR, xor | Leave a comment

Making A Classic Chip From Discretes

A hackspace discussion of voltage regulators within our earshot touched on the famous μA723, then moved on to its competitors. Kits-of-parts for linear regulators were ten-a-penny in the 1970s, it seems. A rambling tale ensued, involving a Lambda power supply with a blown-up chip, and ended up with a Google search for the unit in question. What it turned up was a hack from 2014 that somehow Hackaday missed at the time, the replication by [Eric Schlaepfer] of an out-of-production regulator chip using surface-mount semiconductors when his Lambda PSU expired.

Lambda were one of those annoying electronics companies with a …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, mc1466, regulator, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

34C3: Fitbit Sniffing and Firmware Hacking

If you walked into a gym and asked to sniff exercise equipment you would get some mighty strange looks. If you tell hackers you’ve sniffed a Fitbit, you might be asked to give a presentation. [Jiska] and [DanielAW] were not only able to sniff Bluetooth data from a run-of-the-mill Fitbit fitness tracker, they were also able to connect to the hardware with data lines using test points etched right on the board. Their Fitbit sniffing talk at 34C3 can be seen after the break. We appreciate their warning that opening a Fitbit will undoubtedly void your warranty since Fitbits don’t …read more

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Posted in 34C3, 8909, bluetooth, ccc, cons, fitbit, fitness, reverse engienering, reverse engineering, security, security hacks, sniffing, talk, wearable, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering the Nintendo Switch Joy-Cons

The Switch is Nintendo’s latest effort in the console world. One of its unique features is the Joy-Cons, a pair of controllers that can either attach directly to the console’s screen or be removed and used individually. But how do they work? [dekuNukem] decided to find out.

The reverse engineering efforts begin with disassembly. Surprisingly, there is no silkscreen present on the board to highlight test points or part numbers. This is likely to conflate community efforts to work with the hardware, as different teams may create their own designations for components. Conversely, the chips inside still have their identifying …read more

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Posted in joy-con, joy-cons, joycon, joycons, nintendo, nintendo hacks, Nintendo Switch, reverse engineering, switch | Leave a comment

Fake Ram: Identifying a Counterfeit Chip

[Robert Baruch‏] had something strange on his hands. He had carefully decapped 74LS189 16×4 static RAM, only to find that it wasn’t a RAM at all. The silicon die inside the plastic package even had analog elements, which is not what one would expect to find in an SRAM. But what was it? A quick tweet brought in the cavalry, in the form of chip analysis expert [Ken Shirriff].

[Ken] immediately realized the part [Robert] had uncovered wasn’t a 74 series chip at all. The power and ground pins were in the wrong places. Even the transistors were small CMOS …read more

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Posted in decapped, decapping, dtmf, fake chips, fake ram, hardware, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

Michael Ossmann Pulls DSSS Out of Nowhere

[Michael Ossmann] spoke on Friday to a packed house in the wireless hacking village at DEF CON 25. There’s still a day and a half of talks remaining but it will be hard for anything to unseat his Reverse Engineering Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS) talk as my favorite of the con.

DSSS is a technique used to transmit reliable data where low signal strength and high noise are likely. It’s used in GPS communications where the signal received from a satellite is often far too small for you to detect visually on a waterfall display. Yet we know that …read more

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Posted in cons, DEF CON, defcon 25, Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum, DSSS, gnu radio, gps, michael ossmann, reverse engineering, Wireless Hacking Village, wireless hacks, zigbee | Leave a comment

Getting Data Off Proprietary Glucometers Gets a Little Easier

Glucometers (which measure glucose levels in blood) are medical devices familiar to diabetics, and notorious for being proprietary. Gentoo Linux developer [Flameeyes] has some good news about his open source tool to read and export data from a growing variety of glucometers. For [Flameeyes], the process started four years ago when he needed to send his glucometer readings to his doctor and ended up writing his own tool. Previously it was for Linux only, but now has Windows support.

Glucometers use a variety of different data interfaces, and even similar glucometers from the same manufacturer can use different protocols. Getting …read more

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Posted in blood glucose, csv, diabetes, glucometer, Medical hacks, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering The Monoprice Printer

When the Monoprice MP Select Mini 3D printer was released last year, it was a game changer. This was a printer for $200, yes, but it also held a not-so-obvious secret: a 3D printer controller board no one had ever seen before powered by a 32-bit ARM microcontroller with an ESP8266 handling the UI. This is a game-changing set of electronics in the world of 3D printing, and now, finally, someone is reverse engineering it.

[Robin] began the reverse engineering by attaching the lead of an oscilloscope to the serial line between the main controller and display controller. The baud …read more

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Posted in Monoprice, Monoprice MP Select Mini, reverse engineering | Leave a comment