Category Archives: reverse engineering

Hacking a Cheap Laser Rangefinder

When a new piece of technology comes out, the price is generally so high that it keeps away everyone but the die hard early adopters. But with time the prices inch down enough that more people are willing to buy, which then drives the prices down even more, until eventually the economies of scale really kick in and the thing is so cheap that it’s almost an impulse buy. Linux SBCs, Blu-ray lasers, 3D printers; you name it and the hacker community has probably benefited from the fact that it’s not just the hacker community that’s interested anymore.

Which is …read more

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Posted in laser hacks, laser range finder, reverse engineering, st-link, STM32F100, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering Bottle Threads for Fun and Profit

Recently, one of [Eric]’s clients asked him to design a bottle. Simple enough for a product designer, except that the client needed it to thread into a specific type of cap. And no, they don’t know the specs.

But that’s no problem, thought [Eric] as he turned on the exhaust fan and reached for the secret ingredient that would make casting the negative image of the threads a breeze. He mixed up the foul-smelling body filler with the requisite hardener and some lovely cyan toner powder and packed it into the cap with a tongue depressor. Then he capped off …read more

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Posted in how-to, johnson's wax, reverse engineering, thread | Leave a comment

Eavesdropping on a VGA Monitor’s Conversations

Did you ever wonder what your monitor and your computer are talking about behind your back? As it turns out, there’s quite a conversation going on while the monitor and the computer decide how to get along, and sniffing out VGA communications can reveal some pretty fascinating stuff about the I²C protocol.

To reverse engineer the configuration information exchanged between a VGA monitor and a video card, [Ken Shirriff] began by lopping a VGA cable in two. The inside of such cables is surprisingly complex, with separate shielding wires for each color and sync channel and a host of control …read more

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Posted in i2c, linux, monitor, PocketBeagle, reverse engineering, serial, vga | Leave a comment

How To Reverse Engineer Mechanical Designs for 3D Modeling

If you’re interested in 3D printing or CNC milling — or really any kind of fabrication — then duplicating or interfacing with an existing part is probably on your to-do list. The ability to print replacement parts when something breaks is often one of the top selling points of 3D printing. Want some proof? Just take a look at what people made for our Repairs You Can Print contest.

Of course, to do that you need to be able to make an accurate 3D model of the replacement part. That’s fairly straightforward if the part has simple geometry made up …read more

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Posted in how-to, measuring, mechanical engineering, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering the TEC-06 Battery Tester

[Syonyk] read that you could solder a few wires to a TEC-06 battery capacity tester, connect it to a TTL serial adapter, and it would interface with some Windows software via a serial port. You can buy it already enabled for serial, but since he had the non-connected version, he was interested in trying it. Not only did it work, but he took the time to reverse engineer the protocol and made a detailed write up about his findings and how he attacked the problem.

Around here, we never need an excuse to reverse engineer anything. But [Synonyk] mentions that …read more

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Posted in Microcontrollers, reverse engineering, serial protocol, TEC-06 | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering the TEC-06 Battery Tester

[Syonyk] read that you could solder a few wires to a TEC-06 battery capacity tester, connect it to a TTL serial adapter, and it would interface with some Windows software via a serial port. You can buy it already enabled for serial, but since he had the non-connected version, he was interested in trying it. Not only did it work, but he took the time to reverse engineer the protocol and made a detailed write up about his findings and how he attacked the problem.

Around here, we never need an excuse to reverse engineer anything. But [Synonyk] mentions that …read more

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Posted in Microcontrollers, reverse engineering, serial protocol, TEC-06 | Leave a comment

How To Reverse Engineer Silicon

A few semesters back, [Jordan] was in an Intro to Hardware Security course at CMU. The final project was open ended, and where some students chose projects like implementing a crypto algorithm or designing something on an FPGA, [Jordan] decided to do something a little more ambitious. He wanted to decapsulate and reverse engineer an IC. No, this isn’t taking a peek at billions of transistors — [Jordan] chose a 74-series Quad XOR for this project — but it does show what goes into reverse engineering silicon, and how even simple chips can be maddeningly confusing.

The first step to …read more

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Posted in hardware, reverse engineering, silicon, XNOR, xor | Leave a comment

Making A Classic Chip From Discretes

A hackspace discussion of voltage regulators within our earshot touched on the famous μA723, then moved on to its competitors. Kits-of-parts for linear regulators were ten-a-penny in the 1970s, it seems. A rambling tale ensued, involving a Lambda power supply with a blown-up chip, and ended up with a Google search for the unit in question. What it turned up was a hack from 2014 that somehow Hackaday missed at the time, the replication by [Eric Schlaepfer] of an out-of-production regulator chip using surface-mount semiconductors when his Lambda PSU expired.

Lambda were one of those annoying electronics companies with a …read more

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Posted in mc1466, regulator, reverse engineering | Leave a comment

34C3: Fitbit Sniffing and Firmware Hacking

If you walked into a gym and asked to sniff exercise equipment you would get some mighty strange looks. If you tell hackers you’ve sniffed a Fitbit, you might be asked to give a presentation. [Jiska] and [DanielAW] were not only able to sniff Bluetooth data from a run-of-the-mill Fitbit fitness tracker, they were also able to connect to the hardware with data lines using test points etched right on the board. Their Fitbit sniffing talk at 34C3 can be seen after the break. We appreciate their warning that opening a Fitbit will undoubtedly void your warranty since Fitbits don’t …read more

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Posted in reverse engienering, reverse engineering, security, security hacks, sniffing, talk, wearable, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering the Nintendo Switch Joy-Cons

The Switch is Nintendo’s latest effort in the console world. One of its unique features is the Joy-Cons, a pair of controllers that can either attach directly to the console’s screen or be removed and used individually. But how do they work? [dekuNukem] decided to find out.

The reverse engineering efforts begin with disassembly. Surprisingly, there is no silkscreen present on the board to highlight test points or part numbers. This is likely to conflate community efforts to work with the hardware, as different teams may create their own designations for components. Conversely, the chips inside still have their identifying …read more

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Posted in joy-con, joy-cons, joycon, joycons, nintendo, nintendo hacks, Nintendo Switch, reverse engineering, switch | Leave a comment