Category Archives: security hacks

Bringing the Blockchain to Network Monitoring

If you need to make sure your computer isn’t being messed with, you’ll have a look at the log files. If something seems fishy, that’s grounds for further investigation. If you run a large network of computers, you’ll probably want to look over all of the logs, but you won’t …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, blockchain, cons, security, security hacks | Leave a comment

Building a Better BitTorrent Client in Go

When it comes to peer-to-peer file sharing protocols, BitTorrent is probably one of the best known. It requires a client implementing the program and a tracker to list files available to transfer and to find peer users to transfer those files. Developed in 2001, BitTorrent has since acquired more than …read more

Continue reading

Posted in bit torrent, distributed computing, peer-to-peer, security hacks, software hacks | Leave a comment

Take Security Up a Notch By Adding LEDs

All computers are vulnerable to attacks by viruses or black hats, but there are lots of steps that can be taken to reduce risk. At the extreme end of the spectrum is having an “air-gapped” computer that doesn’t connect to a network at all, but this isn’t a guarantee that …read more

Continue reading

Posted in air gap, attack, Black Hat, led, lights, network, robert fisk, security, security hacks, usb, write | Leave a comment

36C3: Open Source is Insufficient to Solve Trust Problems in Hardware

With open source software, we’ve grown accustomed to a certain level of trust that whatever we are running on our computers is what we expect it to actually be. Thanks to hashing and public key signatures in various parts in the development and deployment cycle, it’s hard for a third …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 36C3, cons, fpga, hardware security, open source, open source hardware, security hacks, trust | Leave a comment

Amazon Ring: Neighbors Leaking Data On Neighbors

For a while now a series of stories have been circulating about Amazon’s Ring doorbell, an Internet-connected camera and entry system that lets users monitor and even interact with visitors and delivery people at their doors. The adverts feature improbable encounters with would-be crooks foiled by the IoT-equipped homeowner, but …read more

Continue reading

Posted in Amazon Neighbors, Amazon Ring, home hacks, IoT, news, security, security hacks | Leave a comment

Kerry Scharfglass Secures Your IoT Things

We’ve all seen the IoT device security trainwrecks: those gadgets that fail so spectacularly that the comment section lights up with calls of “were they even thinking about the most basic security?” No, they probably weren’t. Are you?

Hackaday Contributor and all around good guy Kerry Scharfglass thinks about basic …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, cons, iot security, Microcontrollers, security, security hacks, Supercon | Leave a comment

John McMaster Explains Crypto Ignition Phone Keys and How to Reproduce Them

When you’re a nation state, secure communications are key to protecting your sovereignty and keeping your best laid plans under wraps. For the USA, this requirement led to the development of a series of secure telephony networks over the years. John McMaster found himself interested in investigating the workings of …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 2019 Hackaday Superconference, CIK, cons, crypto, cryptography, security hacks, stu-iii, Supercon | Leave a comment

The ESP32, Laid Bare

Most readers will be familiar with the ESP32, Espressif’s dual-core processor with integrated WiFi and Bluetooth. Few of us though will have explored all of its features, including its built-in encryption facilities and secure booting capability. With these, a developer can protect and secure their code, and keep their devices …read more

Continue reading

Posted in ESP32, glitching, Microcontrollers, news, security, security hacks | Leave a comment

This Week in Security: Fuzzing Fixes, Foul Fonts, TPM Timing Attacks, and More!

An issue was discovered in libarchive through Google’s ClusterFuzz project. Libarchive is a compression and decompression library, widely used in utilities. The issue here is how the library recovers from a malformed archive. Hitting an invalid header causes the memory in use to be freed. The problem is that it’s …read more

Continue reading

Posted in bitlocker, fuzzing, Hackaday Columns, news, security hacks, This Week in Security, Zombieload | Leave a comment

File Compression By Steganography

In a world with finite storage and an infinite need for more storage space, data compression becomes a very necessary problem. Several algorithms for data compression may be more familiar – Huffman coding, LZW compression – and some a bit more arcane.

[Labunsky] decided to put to use his knowledge …read more

Continue reading

Posted in file compression, JPEG, security hacks, Software Development, software hacks, steganography | Leave a comment