Category Archives: Skills

Blacksmithing For The Uninitiated: Let’s Talk About Anvils

When you grow up with something as the constant backdrop to your life, it’s easy to forget as an adult that not everyone else shares your instinctive knowledge of the subject. My dad is a blacksmith, he’s now retired, but as I was growing up his very active forge was …read more

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Posted in anvil, blacksmith, blacksmithing, Blacksmithing for the Uninitiated, forge, forge work, Hackaday Columns, how-to, metalwork, Skills | Leave a comment

Quantum Computing With QISKit

We all know that quantum computing is coming, but it is hard to know how to get started with it. [Mtreinish] suggests Qiskit — an Apache Licensed SDK for developing quantum applications. He has a presentation he gave in Singapore that you can see below, and a notebook you can …read more

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Posted in ibm, jupyter, QISKit, quantum computing, Skills | Leave a comment

Blacksmithing For The Uninitiated: What is a Forge?

Blacksmiths were the high technologists of fabrication up until the industrial revolution gained momentum. At its core, this is the art and science of making any needed tool or mechanism out of metal. Are you using the correct metal? Is the tool strong where it needs to be? And how …read more

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Posted in blacksmith, blacksmithing, forge, forge work, Hackaday Columns, how-to, metalwork, Original Art, Skills | Leave a comment

Threading 3D Printed Parts: How to Use Heat-Set Inserts

We can make our 3D-printed parts even more capable when we start mixing them with some essential “mechanical vitamins.” By combining prints with screws, nuts, fasteners, and pins, we get a rich ecosystem for mechanism-making with capabilities beyond what we could simply print alone.

Today I’d like to share some …read more

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Posted in 3d Printer hacks, 3d printing, Engineering, fabrication, Featured, functional 3d printing, heat set inserts, Skills, threaded insert | Leave a comment

Building A Simple Python API for Internet of Things Gadgets

It’s no secret that I rather enjoy connecting things to the Internet for fun and profit. One of the tricks I’ve learned along the way is to spin up simple APIs that can be used when prototyping a project. It’s easy to do, and simple to understand so I’m happy …read more

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Posted in api, datalogger, Hackaday Columns, how-to, https, IoT, NodeMCU, Original Art, python 3.0, Skills, Tech Hacks | Leave a comment

Hack My House: Garage Door Cryptography Meets Raspberry Pi

Today’s story is one of victory and defeat, of mystery and adventure… It’s time to automate the garage door. Connecting the garage door to the internet was a must on my list of smart home features. Our opener has internet connection capabilities built-in. As you might guess, I’m very skeptical of connecting a device to the internet when I have no control over the software running on it.

The garage door is controlled by a button hung on the garage wall. There is only a pair of wires, so a simple relay should be all that is needed to simulate …read more

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Posted in garage door, Hackaday Columns, home automation, home hacks, Raspberry Pi, relay, RESTful, Skills | Leave a comment

Linux Fu: Easier File Watching

In an earlier installment of Linux Fu, I mentioned how you can use inotifywait to efficiently watch for file system changes. The comments had a lot of alternative ways to do the same job, which is great. But there was one very easy-to-use tool that didn’t show up, so I wanted to talk about it. That tool is entr. It isn’t as versatile, but it is easy to use and covers a lot of common use cases where you want some action to occur when a file changes.

The program is dead simple. It reads a list of file …read more

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Posted in entr, inotify, linux, Linux Fu, linux hacks, Skills, systemd | Leave a comment

AI on Raspberry Pi with the Intel Neural Compute Stick

I’ve always been fascinated by AI and machine learning. Google TensorFlow offers tutorials and has been on my ‘to-learn’ list since it was first released, although I always seem to neglect it in favor of the shiniest new embedded platform.

Last July, I took note when Intel released the Neural Compute Stick. It looked like an oversized USB stick, and acted as an accelerator for local AI applications, especially machine vision. I thought it was a pretty neat idea: it allowed me to test out AI applications on embedded systems at a power cost of about 1W. It requires pre-trained …read more

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Posted in ai, arm, artificial intellegence, facial recognition, Featured, how-to, intel neural compute stick, machine learning, Raspberry Pi, Raspberry Pi 3 B+, Skills | Leave a comment

How To Make Your Own Springs for Extruded Rail T-Nuts

Open-Source Extruded Profile systems are a mature breed these days. With Openbuilds, Makerslide, and Openbeam, we’ve got plenty of systems to choose from; and Amazon and Alibaba are coming in strong with lots of generic interchangeable parts. These open-source framing systems have borrowed tricks from some decades-old industry players like Rexroth and 80/20. But from all they’ve gleaned, there’s still one trick they haven’t snagged yet: affordable springloaded T-nuts.

I’ve discussed a few tricks when working with these systems before, and Roger Cheng came up with a 3D printed technique for working with T-nuts. But today I’ll take another step …read more

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Posted in aluminum extrusion, extruded profiles, extrusion, Hackaday Columns, how-to, makerslide, OpenBeam, openbuilds, Skills, tool hacks, vslot | Leave a comment

Circuit VR: Redundant Flip Flops and Voting Logic

We are somewhat spoiled because electronics today are very reliable compared to even a few decades ago. Most modern electronics obey the bathtub curve. If they don’t fail right away, they won’t fail for a very long time, in all likelihood. However, there are a few cases where that’s not a good enough answer. One is when something really important is at stake — the control systems of an airplane, for example. The other is when you are in an environment that might cause failures. In those cases — near a nuclear reactor or space, for example, you often are …read more

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Posted in flip-flop, fpga, Hackaday Columns, radiation, redundancy, Skills, tmr, triple module redundancy | Leave a comment