Category Archives: software hacks

Spoofing Cell Networks with a USB to VGA Adapter

RTL-SDR brought cheap and ubiquitous Software Defined Radio (SDR) to the masses, opening up whole swaths of the RF spectrum which were simply unavailable to the average hacker previously. Because the RTL-SDR supported devices were designed as TV tuners, they had no capability to transmit. For the price they are still an absolutely fantastic deal, and deserve to be in any modern hacker’s toolkit, but sometimes you want to reach out and touch someone.

Now you can. At OsmoDevCon [Steve Markgraf] released osmo-fl2k, a tool which allows transmit-only SDR through cheap USB 3.0 to VGA adapters based on the Fresco …read more

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Posted in osmo-fl2k, radio hacks, RTL-SDR, sdr, software hacks, usb, vga | Leave a comment

When Detecting Lines Is Harder Than Expected

[Conor Patrick] is no stranger to hardware development, and he’s had an interesting project for the past few months. He’s attempting to create a tool to convert images of technical drawings (such as footprints for electronic components) into digital formats that can be imported into other tools. This could automate turning a typical footprint drawing like the one shown into an actual part definition in a CAD program, which could really speed up the creation of custom parts.

Key to the entire concept is the detection of lines in a black-and-white technical drawing. To some people this won’t sound like …read more

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Posted in cad, footprints, KiCAD, line detection, part generation, software hacks | Leave a comment

Blueprints Make It Easy To Make (Some) Alexa Skills

If you can code, you can create an Alexa skill — the programs that allow an Amazon Echo or similar device interact with you. What if you can’t code or you are just too lazy to do all the setup? Amazon now has Blueprints that can help anyone make a skill. The only problem is the skills you can create are pretty limited. In addition, they are only available to your Alexa devices.

The idea is simple. You start with a template — OK, a blueprint. This is a model application that does something like giving you a compliment or …read more

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Posted in alexa, amazon, Skill, Software Development, software hacks | Leave a comment

TensorFlow in your Browser

If you want to explore machine learning, you can now write applications that train and deploy TensorFlow in your browser using JavaScript. We know what you are thinking. That has to be slow. Surprisingly, it isn’t, since the libraries use Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) acceleration. Of course, that assumes your browser can use your GPU. There are several demos available, include one where you train a Pac Man game to respond to gestures in your webcam to control the game. If you try it and then disable accelerated graphics in your browser options, you’ll see just what a speed up …read more

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Posted in Hackaday Columns, javascript, machine learning, neural network, Software Development, software hacks, tensor flow, tensorflow | Leave a comment

One-Pixel Attack Fools Neural Networks

Deep Neural Networks can be pretty good at identifying images — almost as good as they are at attracting Silicon Valley venture capital. But they can also be fairly brittle, and a slew of research projects over the last few years have been working on making the networks’ image classification less likely to be deliberately fooled.

One particular line of attack involves adding particularly-crafted noise to an image that flips some bits in the deep dark heart of the network, and makes it see something else where no human would notice the difference. We got tipped with a YouTube video …read more

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Posted in artificial neural network, deep neural networks, hype, image recognition, software hacks, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Hide Secret Messages In Plain Sight With Zero-Width Characters

Fingerprinting text is really very nifty; the ability to encode hidden data within a string of characters opens up a large number of opportunities. For example, someone within your team is leaking confidential information but you don’t know who. Simply send each team member some classified text with their name encoded in it. Wait for it to be leaked, then extract the name from the text — the classic canary trap.

Here’s a method that hides data in text using zero-width characters. Unlike various other ways of text fingerprinting, zero width characters are not removed if the formatting is stripped, …read more

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Posted in fingerprinting, security hacks, software hacks, text, zero width, zwfp | Leave a comment

Visualizing Blocked Ads with the Pi Sense Hat

Pi-hole is an open source project to turn that Raspberry Pi collecting dust in your drawer into a whole-network ad blocking appliance. Not only does it stop ads from showing up on all your computers and mobile devices, it also keeps track of how many ads have been blocked and where they came from. Just in case you wanted to know how many thousands of ads you missed out on for a given time period.

While the graphs generated in the web interface of Pi-hole are slick and all, what if you just wanted a quick way of visualizing how …read more

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Posted in adblock, led hacks, Pi-hole, python, Raspberry Pi, sense hat, software hacks | Leave a comment

Tiny Neural Network Library in 200 Lines of Code

Neural networks have gone mainstream with a lot of heavy-duty — and heavy-weight — tools and libraries. What if you want to fit a network into a little computer? There’s tinn — the tiny neural network. If you can compile 200 lines of standard C code with a C or C++ compiler, you are in business. There are no dependencies on other code.

On the other hand, there’s not much documentation, either. However, between the header file and two examples, you should be able to figure it out. After all, it isn’t much code. The example in the repository directs …read more

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Posted in neural network, Software Development, software hacks | Leave a comment

Up AlphaGoer Five

AlphaGo is the deep learning program that can beat humans at the game Go. You can read Google’s highly technical paper on it, but you’ll have to wade through some very academic language. [Aman Agarwal] has done us a favor. He took the original paper and dissected the important parts of in in plain English. If the title doesn’t make sense to you, you need to read more XKCD.

[Aman] says his treatment will be useful for anyone who doesn’t want to become an expert on neural networks but still wants to understand this important breakthrough. He also thinks people …read more

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Posted in AlphaGo, DeepMind, Go, google, software hacks | Leave a comment

Curing a Parrot’s Amnesia with BLEAH

[Dandu] recently wrote in to tell us how he managed to revive his Parrot Flower Power after the manufacturer told him it couldn’t be repaired. To save you the trouble of opening Google in another tab, the Parrot Flower Power is a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) “smart” device for your flower pot. Because of course that’s a thing.

When [Dandu] noticed his Flower Power was no longer being detected by his iOS devices, he contacted support who told him that sadly this was a hardware failure and that he should just throw it away. But he had his doubts about …read more

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Posted in ble, BLEAH, bluetooth, flower power, home hacks, parrot, repair hacks, software hacks | Leave a comment