Category Archives: The Hackaday Prize 2019

InstaBeat Started Out Of Spite

[Tom] teaches electronics with this small programmable MP3 player, but it didn’t get its start as a teaching tool.

As all parents are sometimes required to do, [Tom] was acting as chauffeur for his daughter and his friends. When he played the Beatles one of his passengers informed him that …read more

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Posted in audio, beatles, digital audio hacks, stem, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019 | Leave a comment

If You Need a Measurement Tool Just Build A Measurement Tool

[Darlan Johnson] was working on a wearable project and needed a way to measure the change in voltage and current over time. 

Most measurement tools are designed to take snapshots of a system’s state in a very small window of time, but there are few common ones designed to observe …read more

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Posted in current, custom, Feather, logger, measurement, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019, tool, voltage | Leave a comment

Feel The Virtual Road With Force Feedback

When you’re driving your virtual supercar around the Italian countryside the last thing you want is an inauthentic steering wheel feel, that’s where Open FFBoard comes in. Racing game enthusiasts will go to impossible and sometimes incredibly expensive lengths to build extravagant simulators. [Yannick] feels many of these products are …read more

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A Scratch-built RISC-V CPU in an FPGA

“RISC architecture is going to change everything”, which is why [SHAOS] is building this cool RISC-V DIY retro-style computer.

The project took inspiration from another hacker’s work in building a RISC-V emulator; shared in the Hackaday FPGA chat. He took it a bit further and got it going on an …read more

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Posted in emulate, fpga, lattice, RISC-V, RISCV, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019 | Leave a comment

Tangible Programming Brings Code into The Real World

We love the idea of [Amos]’s Tangible Programming project. It reminds us of those great old Radioshack electronics labs where the circuitry concepts took on a physical aspect that made them way easier to digest than abstractions in an engineering textbook.

MIT Scratch teaches many programming concepts in an easy …read more

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The Ultimate Hacker’s Compact 4WD!

If you’ve spent any time at one of the larger European hacker camps over the last few years you’ll have seen the invasion of little electric vehicles sporting hoverboard motors as an all-in-one propulsion system. German hackers, in particular, have incorporated them into the iconic Bobby Car children’s toy, and …read more

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Posted in 2019 Hackaday Prize, bobby car, electric vehicle, hoverboard, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

uECG – a very small wearable ECG

[Ultimate Robotics] has been working on designing and producing an extremely small ECG that can stream data real time.

Typical electrocardiogram equipment is bulky: miniaturization doesn’t do much for a hospital where optimizations tend to lean towards, durability, longevity, and ease of use. Usually a bunch of leads are strung …read more

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Bobble-Bot Teaches Modern Real-Time Robot Control

Bobble-Bot uses the standard inverted pendulum problem to teach modern robotic control using a Raspberry Pi, RT-Linux, and ROS.

We’re really impressed by the polish and design effort put into this project, and it’s no surprise that it’s a finalist in the 2019 Hackaday Prize. Bobble-Bot is a top heavy …read more

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Posted in bobble-bot, inverted pendulum, real, robot, robots hacks, ros, rt, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019, time | Leave a comment

Giving Sight to the Blind with A Wave of the Hand

[Jakob Kilian] is working on a glove that he hopes will let the blind “see” their surroundings.

One of the most fascinating examples of the human brain’s plasticity is in its ability to map one sense to another. Some people, for example, report being able to see sound, giving them …read more

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Posted in blind, haptics, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019, visually impaired | Leave a comment

Servo Socks is a Brilliantly Simple Solution For Quick Hacking

[Dan Kitchen] has a great solution for making servos easy to hack.

Every hacker has a drawer full of servo’s somewhere. Just about every project that uses them starts off by measuring the spacing and designing some obscure bracket to meet that unique motor’s size. However, what if you could …read more

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Posted in hdpe, servo, servocase, The Hackaday Prize, The Hackaday Prize 2019 | Leave a comment