Category Archives: tool hacks

1,000 Watt Power Supply Tear Down And Repair

[TheSignalPath] wanted to repair a broken Instek PSW80-40.5 because it has a lot of output for a programmable power supply — 1,080 watts, to be exact. This isn’t a cheap supply — it looks like it costs about $2,200 new. The unit wasn’t working and when he took it apart, he found a nasty surprise. There is a base PCB and three identical power supply modules, and virtually no access without disconnecting the boards. He continued the teardown, and you can see the results in the video below.

Each of the power supply modules are two separate PCBs and the …read more

Continue reading

Posted in instek, power supply, repair hacks, teardown, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Professional Results From Cheap Air Compressors

The portable air compressors sold at big box hardware stores like Lowe’s and Home Depot are perfectly suited for the jobs they’re advertised for: namely throwing some nails into the wall or filling tires. But if you try to respray your car with that $50 Black Friday pancake air compressor, you’re going to have a bad day. The relatively small amount of air they hold is almost guaranteed to be contaminated with oil and moisture, making it unsuitable for painting or even just blowing the dust out of electronics.

But all is not lost. [Stephen Saville] has done an excellent …read more

Continue reading

Posted in air cleaner, air compressor, air tools, cyclone separator, spray paint, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Reverse Engineering With Sandpaper

Every once in a while, and more so now than before, you’ll find a really neat chip with zero documentation. In [David]’s case, it’s a really cool USB 3.0 eMMC/ SD MMC controller. Use this chip, attach a USB port on one end, and some memory on the other, and you have a complete bridge. There are drivers, too. There are products shipping with this chip. The problem is, there is no data sheet. Wanting to use this chip, [David] turned to sandpaper to figure out the pinout of this chip.

The best example of a product that came with …read more

Continue reading

Posted in emmc, reverse engineering, sandpaper, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Overlooked Minimalism in Assistive Technology

If your eyes are 20/20, you probably do not spend much time thinking about prescription eyeglasses. It is easy to overlook that sort of thing, and we will not blame you. When we found this creation, it was over two years old, but we had not seen anything quite like it. The essence of the Bear Paw Assistive Eating Aid is a swiveling magnet atop a suction cup base. Simple right? You may already be thinking about how you could build or model that up in a weekend, and it would not be a big deal. The question is, could …read more

Continue reading

Posted in assistive, disability, eat, eating, food, Independent, Medical hacks, minimal, minimalism, physical disability, rehabilitation, self sufficiency, self sufficient, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Simulating A Speaker

Speakers are one of those components that are simple to use, but difficult to simulate. Most of us have used a simple resistor to do the job. But a speaker’s response is much more complex, and while that might be enough for a simple simulation the fidelity is nowhere near close. [Sourav Gupta] recently shared his technique for modeling speakers and it looks as though it does a credible job.

[Sourav] shows how a simple resistor and an inductor can do the job, but for better fidelity you need more components to model some mechanical effects. The final model has …read more

Continue reading

Posted in falstad, LTSpice, speaker, SPICE, thiele, tool hacks, tsp | Leave a comment

High Voltage Measurement is Shockingly Safe

With the right equipment and training, it’s possible to safely work on energized power lines in the 500 kV range with bare hands. Most of us, though, don’t have the right equipment or training, and should take great care when working with any appreciable amount of voltage. If you want to safely measure even the voltages of the wiring in your house there’s still substantial danger, and you’ll want to take some precautions like using isolated amplifiers.

While there are other safe methods for measuring line voltage or protecting your oscilloscope, [Jason]’s isolated amplifier method uses high voltage capacitors to …read more

Continue reading

Posted in high voltage, Isolation, mains power, oscilloscope, perfboard, ti, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Arduino Provides Hands-Free Focus for Digital Inspection Scope

With surface-mount technology pushing the size of components ever smaller, even the most eagle-eyed among us needs some kind of optical assistance to do PCB work. Lots of microscopes have digital cameras too, which can be a big help – unless the camera fights you.

Faced with a camera whose idea of autofocus targets on didn’t quite coincide with his, [Scott M. Baker] took matters into his own hands – foot, actually – by replacing mouse inputs to the camera with an outboard controller. His particular camera’s autofocus can be turned off, but only via mouse clicks on the camera’s …read more

Continue reading

Posted in arduino pro micro, camera, Eakins, emulation, focus, footswitch, gui, inspection, microscope, optics, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Printed Parts Turn Ruler into Marking Gauge

For Hackaday readers who spend more time with a soldering iron than a saw, a marking gauge is a tool used to put parallel lines on a piece of wood (and occasionally metal or plastic) for cutting. The tool is run across the edge of the piece to be marked, and an adjustment allows the user to set how far in the line will be made. As an example, if you wanted to cut a board into smaller strips, a marking gauge would be an ideal choice for laying out your lines ahead of time.

But as with many niche …read more

Continue reading

Posted in 3D printed parts, headstock, marking gauge, scribe, tool hacks, woodworking | Leave a comment

Junkbox Constant Current Source Helps with Kelvin Sensing

Is it ironic when a YouTube channel named “The Current Source” needs to build a current source? Or is that not ironic and actually just coincidental?

Regardless of linguistic considerations, [Derek], proprietor of the aforementioned channel has made and disassembled a few current sources in his day. Most of those jobs were for one-off precision measurements or even to drive a string of LEDs in what he describes as a pair of migraine-inducing glasses. Thankfully, The junk box current source presented in the video below is more in service of the former than the latter, as his goal is to …read more

Continue reading

Posted in constant current, current cource, four-wire sensing, kelvin clips, kelvin measurement, LM317, tool hacks | Leave a comment

Homebrew Attachment Turns Angle Grinder into Slimline Belt Sander

If there’s a small power tool as hackable as the angle grinder, we haven’t found it yet. These versatile tools put a lot of power in the palm of your hand, and even unhacked they have a huge range of functionality, from cutting to grinding to polishing and cleaning, just by choice of what goes on the arbor.

With a simple homebrew attachment, [Darek] turned his angle grinder into a micro-belt sander that’s great for those hard-to-reach places. The attachment that clamps where the disc guard normally lives adds a drive roller to the grinder’s arbor; idler rollers ride on …read more

Continue reading

Posted in angle grinder, belt sander, diy, idler, pneumatic spring, tensioner, tool hacks | Leave a comment