Category Archives: transportation hacks

A Jet Engine On A Bike. What’s The Worst That Could Happen?

On today’s edition of ‘don’t try this at home,’ we’re transported to Russia to see [Igor Negoda]’s working jet bicycle.

This standard mountain bike comes equipped with a jet engine capable of 18kg of thrust, fixed to the frame under the seat with an adjustable bracket to change it’s angle as needed. A cell phone is zip-tied to the frame and acts as a speedometer — if it works, it’s not stupid — and an engine controller displays thrust, rpm and temperature.  A LiPo battery is the engine’s power source with a separate, smaller battery for the electronics. The bike …read more

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Posted in bicycle, bike, engine, fuel, jet, mountain, russia, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

Open Source High Power EV Motor Controller

For anyone with interest in electric vehicles, especially drives and control systems for EV’s, the Endless-Sphere forum is the place to frequent. It’s full of some amazing projects covering electric skateboards to cars and everything in between. [Marcos Chaparro] recently posted details of his controller project — the VESC-controller, an open source controller capable of driving motors up to 200 hp.

[Marcos]’s controller is a fork of the VESC by [Benjamin Vedder] who has an almost cult following among the forum for “creating something that all DIY electric skateboard builders have been longing for, an open source, highly programmable, high …read more

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Posted in BLDC, electric vehicle, esc, field oriented control, FOC, igbt, KiCAD, motor, motor controller, STM32F4, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

Hackaday Prize Entry: Smart Electric Bike Controller

One of the more interesting yet underrated technological advances of the last decade or so is big brushless motors and high-capacity batteries. This has brought us everything from quadcopters to good electric cars, usable cordless power tools, and of course electric bicycles. For his Hackaday Prize project, [marcus] is working on a very powerful electric bicycle controller. It can deliver 1000 Watts, it’s got Bluetooth, and there’s even an Android app for some neat diagnostics.

The specs for this eBike controller are pretty much what you would expect. It’s able to deliver a whole Kilowatt, can use 48 V batteries, …read more

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Posted in 2017 Hackaday Prize, BLDC, BLDC controller, ebike, electric bicycle, electric bike, The Hackaday Prize, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

This Electric Longboard Collapses for Air Travel

How do you manage to get an electric off-road longboard past TSA and onto an international flight? Simple — make it a collapsible longboard that fits into a carry-on bag.

The mechanical and electrical feats accomplished by [transistor-man] may not be the most impressive parts of this hack. We’re pretty impressed by the build, starting as it did with the big knobby tires and front truck from an unused mountain board and the hub motor from a hoverboard, turning this into a trike. The incredible shrinking chassis comes courtesy of a couple of stout drawer slides and cam locks to …read more

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Posted in air travel, battery, hub motor, lithium ion, longboard, off road, transportation hacks, travel, TSA | Leave a comment

Re-Engineering The Ford Model A Engine

Over the nearly a quarter century since the Web has been in existence, there have been various websites and projects in the field covered by Hackaday that have done the rounds and captured our attention for a while. Some have turned into major projects and products, others have collapsed spectacularly, while many have faded away and been forgotten.

It was one of those “I wonder what happened to… ” moments that prompted a search for just such a project that did the rounds a little at the start of this decade. Re-Engineering the Model A Engine is [Terry Burtz]’s project …read more

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Posted in engine, Ford Model A, Ford Motor Company, metallurgy, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

Ultrasonic Array Gets Range Data Fast and Cheap

How’s your parallel parking? It’s a scenario that many drivers dread to the point of avoidance. But this 360° ultrasonic sensor will put even the most skilled driver to shame, at least those who pilot tiny remote-controlled cars.

Watch the video below a few times and you’ll see that within the limits of the test system, [Dimitris Platis]’ “SonicDisc” sensor does a pretty good job of nailing the parallel parking problem, a driving skill so rare that car companies have spent millions developing vehicles that do it for you. The essential task is good spatial relations, and that’s where SonicDisc …read more

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Posted in atmega 328p, HC-SR04, i2c, parallel parking, ranging, robots hacks, self-driving, sonar, transportation hacks, ultrasonic | Leave a comment

ESP8266 Adds Slick Touchscreen Controls to a Stretch Limo

The popularity of the ESP8266 WiFi module has a lot to do with its ability to inexpensively connect to the Internet. However, [hwhardsoft]’s stretch limousine environmental control system explores another use for these modules: a simple way to tie together disparate systems with a common user interface.

On a basic level, the problem is one we’ve all faced: multiple devices with multiple control interfaces create an awkward user experience. Have you ever worked in an office with 6 brands of air conditioner requiring 6 different remotes? Because of its low-cost, support for Wi-Fi, serial, and GPIO, ESP8266 boards are a …read more

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Posted in ESP8266, LED controller, led hacks, limousine, touchscreen, transportation hacks | Leave a comment

Mini Oscar Mayer Wienermobile Takes Moxie in KC

There are no shortage of fantastic and creative Power Racing Series cars, but here’s an especially fun example. [Pete Prodoehl] of Milwaukee Makerspace and his teammates [Kathy Cannistra] and [Kyle White] built a Power Racing car based on the design of the iconic Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.

They created the wienie and bun out of fiberglass and foam. Meanwhile, with the KC Maker Faire approaching, the team scrambled to finish the project, with [Kyle] working on assembly while [Pete] tackled the electronics. [Kyle] also proved to be the best wiener rider, with everyone else getting thrown off.

It should be noted …read more

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Posted in Maker Faire KC, power racing series, ppprs, transportation hacks, wienermobile | Leave a comment

Possibly the Most Up-Cycled, Hacked E-Bike You’ll See All Week

When it comes to bringing an idea to life it’s best to have both a sense of purpose, and an eagerness to apply whatever is on hand in order to get results. YouTube’s favorite Ukrainians [KREOSAN] are chock full of both in their journey to create this incredible DIY e-bike using an angle grinder with a friction interface to the rear wheel, and a horrifying battery pack made of cells salvaged from what the subtitles describe as “defective smartphone charging cases”.

What’s great to see is the methodical approach taken to creating the bike. [KREOSAN] began with an experiment consisting …read more

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Posted in angle grinder, battery, diy, e-bike, electric bike, electric motorcycle, kreosan, recycled, salvaged, smartphone battery, speed control, transportation hacks, ukraine, upcycled | Leave a comment

DIY Electric Beach Luge is a Thrill

[John Dingley] describes his Electric Beach Luge Project as an exciting mashup between “a downhill luge board, a kite surf buggy, a go-kart, and a Star Wars Land Speeder” and it’s fresh from a successful test run. What’s not to like? The DIY experimental vehicle was made to run on long, flat, firm stretches of sand while keeping the rider as close to the ground as possible. The Beach Luge is mainly intended to be ridden while lying on one’s back, luge-style, but it’s also possible to lay prone in the “Superman” position.

The whole unit was built from the …read more

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Posted in beach, diy, Electric motor, electric vehicle, go-kart, land speeder, luge, personal transport, superman, transportation hacks | Leave a comment