Category Archives: ultrasonic

Behold a 3D Display, Thanks to a Speeding Foam Ball

We’ve seen 3D image projection tried in a variety of different ways, but this is a new one to us. This volumetric display by Interact Lab of the University of Sussex creates a 3D image by projecting light onto a tiny foam ball, which zips around in the air fast …read more

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Posted in 3d, acoustic, levitation, science, ultrasonic, video hacks, volumetric display | Leave a comment

Worried About Bats in your Belfry? A Tale of Two Bat Detectors

As somebody who loves technology and wildlife and also needs to develop an old farmhouse, going down the bat detector rabbit hole was a journey hard to resist. Bats are ideal animals for hackers to monitor as they emit ultrasonic frequencies from their mouths and noses to communicate with each …read more

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Posted in ArduBat, bat detector, digital audio hacks, Hackaday Columns, misc hacks, ultrasonic | Leave a comment

Capture a Star in a Jar with Sonoluminescence

If nothing else, [Justin Atkin] is persistent. How else do you explain a five-year quest to create sonoluminescence with simple tools?

So what exactly is sonoluminescence? The short answer is as the name suggests: a release of light caused by sound. In [Justin]’s case, he used an ultrasonic transducer to …read more

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Posted in cavitation, LC circuit, misc hacks, sonoluminescence, transducer, ultrasonic, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Lessons Learned From An Art Installation Build

Art installations are an interesting business, which more and more often tend to include electronic or mechanical aspects to their creation. Compared to more mainstream engineering, things in this space are often done quite a bit differently. [Jan Enning-Kleinejan] worked on an installation called Prendre la parole, and shared the …read more

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Posted in arduino, art, art installation, ultrasonic, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Making an Ultrasonic Cutter for Post-processing Tiny 3D Prints

An ultrasonic knife is a blade that vibrates a tiny amount at a high frequency, giving the knife edge minor superpowers. It gets used much like any other blade, but it becomes far easier to cut through troublesome materials like rubber or hard plastics. I was always curious about them, and recently made my own by modifying another tool. It turns out that an ultrasonic scaling tool intended for dental use can fairly easily be turned into a nimble little ultrasonic cutter for fine detail work.

I originally started thinking about an ultrasonic knife to make removing supports from SLA …read more

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Posted in 3d printed, 3D printed supports, 3d Printer hacks, chisel, cutter, dental scaler, diy, Hackaday Columns, post-processing, removing supports, scaler, sla, tool hacks, ultrasonic, ultrasonic cutter, ultrasonic knife | Leave a comment

72 Tranducers For Acoustic Levitation

Levitation has a way of arousing curiousity and wonder wherever it appears. There’s a multitude of ways to do it, each with their own strengths and weaknesses and ideal use cases. [Julius Kramer] tried his hand at acoustic levitation, and decided to share his build.

The build relies on an astounding number of ultrasonic transducers – 72, in fact. The device operates at 40 kHz to be well above the human range of hearing. 36 each are placed in the top and bottom shells of the device’s 3D printed chassis. Through careful construction, the transducers are placed an integer multiple …read more

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Posted in acoustic levitation, acoustic levitator, levitation, levitator, science, transducer, ultrasonic, ultrasound | Leave a comment

A $4 Ultrasonic Theremin Looks Cheesy on Purpose

We don’t think [bleepbit] will take offense when we say the “poor man’s theremin” looks cheesy — after all, it was built in a cheese container. Actually, it isn’t a bad case for a simple device, as you can see in the picture and the video below. Unlike a traditional theremin, the device uses ultrasonics to detect how far away your hand is and modifies the sound based on that.

There are also two buttons — one to turn the sound off and another to cycle through some effects. We liked how it looked like a retro cassette, though. The …read more

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Posted in arduinio, Arduino Hacks, music, musical hacks, theremin, ultrasonic | Leave a comment

Using Acoustic Levitation for Applications Going Way Beyond Novelty

We’ve all seen acoustic levitation, it’s one of the scientific novelties of our age and a regular on the circuit of really impressive physical demonstrations of science to the public. The sight of arrays of ultrasonic speakers causing small objects and beads of liquid to float in mid-air without any suspension is magical, captivating people of all ages. Thus a lecture at Hackaday Belgrade on the subject from Asier Marzo, a research scientist with a speciality in the field of ultrasonics at the UK’s University of Bristol, was a particularly fascinating and informative one.

He started by explaining acoustic levitation …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, cons, Hackaday Belgrade, Hackaday Belgrade 2018, ultrasonic, ultrasonic levitation, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Fail Of The Week: How Not To Make A 3D Scanner

Sometimes the best you can say about a project is, “Nice start.” That’s the case for this as-yet awful DIY 3D scanner, which can serve both as a launching point for further development and a lesson in what not to do.

Don’t get us wrong, we have plenty of respect for [bitluni] and for the fact that he posts his failures as well as his successes, like composite video and AM radio signals from an ESP32. He used an ESP8266 in this project, which actually uses two different sensors: an ultrasonic transducer, and a small time-of-flight laser chip. Each was …read more

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Posted in ESP8266, Fail of the Week, JSN-SR04T, lidar, TOF, ultrasonic, VL53L0X, WebGL, wemos d1 mini | Leave a comment

Dual Sensor Echo Locator Gives High Accuracy at Low Cost

Infrared certainly has its uses, but if you’re trying to locate objects, ultrasonic detection is far superior. It’s contact-less, undetectable to the human ear, and it isn’t affected by smoke, dust, ambient light, or Silly String.

If you have one ultrasonic sensor and a microcontroller, you can detect plenty of useful things, like the water level in a rain barrel or the distance traveled by a tablet along a rail. If you have two sensors and a microcontroller, you can pinpoint any object within a defined range using trigonometry.

[lingib]’s dual sensor echo locator uses two HY-SRF05s, but the cheap …read more

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Posted in echolocation, HC-SR04, HY-SRF05, ultrasonic, ultrasonic distance sensor, ultrasonic transducer | Leave a comment