Category Archives: ultrasound

Wearable Cone of Silence Protects You from Prying Ears

Careful,  the walls have ears. Or more specifically, the smart speaker on the table has ears, as does the phone in your pocket, the fitness band on your wrist, possibly the TV, the fridge, the toaster, and maybe even the toilet. Oh, and your car is listening to you too. …read more

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Posted in alexa, google assistant, interference, jamming, MEMS, misc hacks, noise, non-linear, privacy, security, security hacks, smart speaker, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Hackaday Links: January 5, 2020

It looks like the third decade of the 21st century is off to a bit of a weird start, at least in the middle of the United States. There, for the past several weeks, mysterious squads of multicopters have taken to the night sky for reasons unknown. Witnesses on the …read more

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Posted in colorado, data recovery, drone, Hackaday Columns, Hackaday links, hard drive, laser, magnet, medical imaging, mobility, non-contact, search, segway, self balancing, uav, ultrasound | Leave a comment

How Safe is That Ultrasonic Bath for Flux Removal?

How do you clean the residual flux off your boards? There are plenty of ways to go about the job, ranging from “why bother?” to the careful application of isopropyl alcohol to every joint with a cotton swab. It seems like more and more people are turning to ultrasonic cleaners …read more

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Posted in cavitation, cleaning, flux, MEMS, misc hacks, pcb, removal, resonance, sonication, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Capture a Star in a Jar with Sonoluminescence

If nothing else, [Justin Atkin] is persistent. How else do you explain a five-year quest to create sonoluminescence with simple tools?

So what exactly is sonoluminescence? The short answer is as the name suggests: a release of light caused by sound. In [Justin]’s case, he used an ultrasonic transducer to …read more

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Posted in cavitation, LC circuit, misc hacks, sonoluminescence, transducer, ultrasonic, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Lessons Learned From An Art Installation Build

Art installations are an interesting business, which more and more often tend to include electronic or mechanical aspects to their creation. Compared to more mainstream engineering, things in this space are often done quite a bit differently. [Jan Enning-Kleinejan] worked on an installation called Prendre la parole, and shared the …read more

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Posted in arduino, art, art installation, ultrasonic, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Simple Ultrasound Machine Shows The Skeleton Lurking Inside Us All

That first glimpse of a child in the womb as a black and white image on a screen is a thrilling moment for any parent-to-be, made possible by several hundred thousand dollars worth of precision medical instrumentation. This ultrasound machine cobbled together from eBay parts and modules is not that …read more

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Posted in 74121, Arduino DUE, boost converter, LM7171, Medical hacks, pulse, SD811, transducer, ultrasound | Leave a comment

72 Tranducers For Acoustic Levitation

Levitation has a way of arousing curiousity and wonder wherever it appears. There’s a multitude of ways to do it, each with their own strengths and weaknesses and ideal use cases. [Julius Kramer] tried his hand at acoustic levitation, and decided to share his build.

The build relies on an astounding number of ultrasonic transducers – 72, in fact. The device operates at 40 kHz to be well above the human range of hearing. 36 each are placed in the top and bottom shells of the device’s 3D printed chassis. Through careful construction, the transducers are placed an integer multiple …read more

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Posted in acoustic levitation, acoustic levitator, levitation, levitator, science, transducer, ultrasonic, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Using Acoustic Levitation for Applications Going Way Beyond Novelty

We’ve all seen acoustic levitation, it’s one of the scientific novelties of our age and a regular on the circuit of really impressive physical demonstrations of science to the public. The sight of arrays of ultrasonic speakers causing small objects and beads of liquid to float in mid-air without any suspension is magical, captivating people of all ages. Thus a lecture at Hackaday Belgrade on the subject from Asier Marzo, a research scientist with a speciality in the field of ultrasonics at the UK’s University of Bristol, was a particularly fascinating and informative one.

He started by explaining acoustic levitation …read more

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Posted in classic hacks, cons, Hackaday Belgrade, Hackaday Belgrade 2018, ultrasonic, ultrasonic levitation, ultrasound | Leave a comment

An Ultrasound Driver With Open Source FPGAs

Ultrasound imaging has been around for decades, but Open Source ultrasound has not. While there are a ton of projects out there attempting to create open ultrasound devices, most of this is concentrated on the image-processing side of things, and not the exceptionally difficult problem of pinging a sensor at millions of times a second, listening for the echo, and running that through a very high speed ADC.

For his entry into the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is doing just that. He’s building an ultrasound board that’s built around Open Hardware, a fancy Open Source FPGA, and a lot of very …read more

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Posted in iCE40, The Hackaday Prize, ultrasound | Leave a comment

Turn Medical Imaging From 2D Into 3D With Just $10

One of the modern marvels in our medical toolkit is ultrasound imaging. One of its drawbacks, however, is that it displays 2D images. How expensive do you think it would be to retrofit an ultrasound machine to produce 3D images? Try a $10 chip and pennies worth of plastic.

While — of all things — playing the Wii with his son, [Joshua Broder, M.D], an emergency physician and associate professor of surgery at [Duke Health], realized he could port the Wii’s gyroscopic sensor to ultrasound technology. He did just that with the help of [Matt Morgan, Carl Herickhoff and Jeremy …read more

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Posted in hospital, Imaging, Medical hacks, ultrasound, wii | Leave a comment