Category Archives: wearable hacks

Lifelike Dinosaur Emerges From The Plumbing Aisle

Despite the incredible advancements in special effects technology since the film’s release, the dinosaurs in 1993’s Jurassic Park still look just as terrifying today as they did nearly 30 years ago. This has largely been attributed to the fact that the filmmakers wisely decided to use physical models in many …read more

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Posted in animatronic, costume, dinosaur, foam, PVC, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Scratch Built Smartwatch Looks Pretty Darn Sharp with 3D Printed Case and Round LCD

These days, if you want a smart watch, you’re spoiled for choice. The major smartphone players all have devices on the market, and there’s plenty of third party manufacturers vying for your dollar, too. You might think it’s impossible achieve the same finish with a 3D printer and a reflow …read more

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Posted in ble, bluetooth low energy, smartwatch, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

RFID Payment Ring Made from Dissolved Credit Card

RFID payment systems are one of those things that the community seems to be divided on. Some only see the technology as a potential security liability, and will go a far as to disable the RFID chip in their card so that it can’t be read by a would-be attacker. …read more

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Posted in contactless payment, credit card, magnet wire, radio hacks, rfid, silicone mold, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Meet Tympan, The Open Hardware Hearing Aid

If you’re the kind of person who’s serious about using open source software and hardware, relying on a medical device like a pacemaker or an insulin pump can be a particular insult. You wouldn’t trust the technology with your email, and yet you’re forced to put your life into the …read more

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Posted in bluetooth, hearing aid, medical devices, Medical hacks, Teensy, Tympan, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Three-Conductor Pivot for E-Textiles is Better Than Wires

Pivots for e-textiles can seem like a trivial problem. After all, wires and fabrics bend and flex just fine. However, things that are worn on a body can have trickier needs. Snap connectors are the usual way to get both an electrical connection and a pivot point, but they provide only a single conductor. When [KOBAKANT] had a need for a pivoting connection with three electrical conductors, they came up with a design that did exactly that by using a flexible circuit board integrated to a single button snap.

This interesting design is part of a solution to a specific …read more

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Posted in copper tape, diy, e-textile, flexible PCB, hall effect, Kapton, pivot, sensor, textile, wearable, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Hackaday Superconference: Estefannie’s Daft Punk Helmet

There’s no single formula for success, but if we’ve learned anything over the years of covering cons, contests, and hackathons, it’s that, just like in geology, pressure can create diamonds. Give yourself an impossible deadline with high stakes, and chances are good that something interesting will result. That’s what Estefannie from the YouTube channel “Estefannie Explains It All” did when Bay Area Maker Faire was rolling around last year, and she stopped by the 2018 Hackaday Superconference to talk about the interactive Daft Punk helmet that came out of it.

It’s a rapid-fire tour of Estefannie’s remarkably polished replica of …read more

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Posted in 2018 Hackaday Superconference, cons, daft punk, DragonBoard, fabrication, helmet, led hacks, mold, Skills, thermoforming, vacuum forming, wearable hacks, Wearables | Leave a comment

Cyberpunk Jacket Is The Garment of Choice For The Streets of 2019

Fans of science fiction and related genres have always been disappointed by real life. The future holds so much promise on paper, yet millions were disappointed upon reaching 2015 to find that hoverboard technology still eluded us. It’s not all bad, though – [abetusk] has developed a cyberpunk jacket so you can live out your grungy hacker fantasies in real life.

The effect is achieved with specially designed jacket patches. Nylon fabric is lasercut with artwork or lettering, and then placed over an electroluminescent panel. The fabric acts as a mask and is glued onto the EL panel, and the …read more

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Posted in cyberpunk, el, EL panel, electroluminescence, electroluminescent, jacket, wearable, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Lenses For DIY Augmented Reality Will Get a Bit Less Unobtainable

You may remember that earlier this year Leap Motion revealed Project North Star, a kind of open-source reference design for an Augmented Reality (AR) headset. While it’s not destined to make high scores in the fashion department, it aims to be hacker-friendly and boasts a large field of view. There’s also an attractive element of “what you see is what you get” when it comes to the displays and optical design, which is a good thing for hackability. Instead of everything residing in a black box, the system uses two forward-facing displays (one for each eye) whose images are …read more

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Posted in ar, augmented reality, beamsplitter, curved mirror, curved reflective lens, Leap motion, lenses, open source, optics, project north star, reflective lens, Virtual Reality, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Wearable Speeder Bikes Are Ready For A Night Out

While Hackaday is about as far from a fashion blog as you can possibly get, we have to admit we’re absolutely loving the [bithead942] Winter 2018 Collection. His wife and daughter recently got to model his latest must have design: wearable Star Wars speeder bikes; and judging by the video after the break they were certainly some of the best dressed at the Thanksgiving parade.

[bithead942] started the build by taking careful measurements of a vintage speeder bike model kit his wife had, which allowed to accurately recreate the iconic look of the vehicles as they were seen in Return …read more

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Posted in chicken wire, cosplay, PVC, speeder bike, star wars, wearable hacks | Leave a comment

Corporate Badgelife: Oracle’s Code Card

We tend to think of elaborate electronic conference badges as something limited to the hacker scene, but it looks like the badgelife movement is starting to hit the big time. Now even the “big boys” are getting into the act, and pretty soon you won’t be able to go to a stuffy professional conference without seeing a sea of RGB LEDs firing off. We’ll let the good readers of Hackaday determine if this means it’s officially post-cool or not.

[Noel Portugal] writes in to tell us about how he created the “Code Card” during his tenure with the Oracle Groundbreakers …read more

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Posted in badgelife, cloud, cons, e-ink, ESP8266, grove, hardware, wearable hacks, web application | Leave a comment