Category Archives: wheatstone bridge

Quartet of SMD Resistors Used to Sense Z-Axis Height

Here’s a neat trick for your next 3D-printer build or retrofit: a Z-axis sensor using a DIY strain gauge made from SMD resistors. We’re betting it could have plenty of other applications, too.

Conventional load cells, at least the ones you can pick up cheaply from the usual sources or harvest from old kitchen or bathroom scales, are usually way too big to be used on the extruder of a 3D-printer. [IvDm] wanted to build a touch sensor for his Hybercube printer, so he built his own load cell to do it. It consists of four 1000 ohm SMD resistors …read more

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Posted in 3d Printer hacks, attiny85, bed leveling, hx711, load cell, smd, strain gauge, wheatstone bridge, z-height | Leave a comment

Crossing Wheatstone Bridges

The Wheatstone bridge is a way of measuring resistance with great accuracy and despite having been invented over 150 years ago, it still finds plenty of use today. Even searching for it on Hackaday brings up its use in a number of hacks. It’s a fundamental experimental device, and you should know about it.

How It Works

Here’s an easy way to understand how the Wheatstone bridge works. In the schematic are two voltage dividers (pairs of resistors in series): R1 with R2 and R3 with R4. If you do the math, you’ll notice that the voltages across R1 and …read more

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Posted in Interest, murray loop, potentiometer, strain gage, strain gauge, thermistor, wheatstone bridge | Leave a comment